47 Insights http://www.remixcave.com Grow your SaaS with high performance marketing Thu, 26 Mar 2020 22:46:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 http://www.remixcave.com/wp-content/uploads/cropped-47i-512-32x32.png 47 Insights http://www.remixcave.com 32 32 SaaS Marketing Insights is an interview show where we ask SaaS founders, CEOs, marketers and investors about the lessons they’ve learned in their quest to grow their companies. Hosted by Paul Stephenson, Founder & CEO of SaaS marketing agency, 47 Insights. 47 Insights yes episodic 47 Insights paul@47insights.com paul@47insights.com (47 Insights) 47 Insights Inc SaaS business leaders share how to grow 47 Insights http://www.remixcave.com/wp-content/uploads/itunes.jpg http://www.remixcave.com TV-MA Weekly Lead Form Ads: How To Get Leads Without Landing Pages http://www.remixcave.com/blog/lead-form-ads/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/lead-form-ads/#respond Thu, 26 Mar 2020 22:45:50 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=2093 The business case for why software startups should experiment with paid acquisition, plus five SaaS paid acquisition ideas for 2020 and advice on getting started with paid and tips about attribution and assumptions.

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What are lead form ads?

There was a time when the only way to get leads from digital advertising was to use a landing page. That meant time and money spent in designing and building a landing page before you could even run your ads. Now there are a growing number of channels (Facebook, Instagram, Google, YouTube, LinkedIn, Snapchat) where you can run lead form ads that collect the prospects’ details directly from within the ad. Read on to find out if lead form ads could work for you.

How lead form ads work

All lead form ads work in a similar way. The prospect clicks on your ad and is shown a form without leaving the site or app. For most of the social networks this form is prefilled with the prospect’s details such as name and email address, leaving the user only to complete any additional form fields. Once the form is submitted their details are either stored in the ad system for you to download later or, if configured, sent directly to your CRM or other solution.

How to use lead form ads

Lead form ads are ideal for businesses of all kinds that want to capture leads at the top of the funnel for follow up by sales or by an email drip campaign. Typical uses include:

  • Early access to new product/service
  • Email newsletter signups
  • Webinar signups
  • Offers and promotions
  • Lead magnet (info)
  • Competitions
  • Request a quote or sample

Lead form ads are designed to minimize the friction for the lead to complete the form so it’s best to keep both the offer and the form as simple as possible. Resist the temptation to promote complex products or services, or ask for too many details. Keep the offer simple, and the number of form fields to the minimum.

Lead form ads vs landing pages

Setting up and managing landing pages is both expensive and time consuming. In addition to landing page design and development costs already mentioned, you should also be tracking conversions accurately (sometimes harder than it should be) and running landing page variation tests to improve performance. And unless you are already an experienced digital marketer, you will need to pay someone to set up and manage your landing pages for you. You may also decide you need a dedicated landing page solution like Unbounce or LeadPages, so you could end up paying a software subscription as well.

In contrast, designing and building a lead form ad is quick and easy. And conversion rates are tracked accurately because leads never leave the site or app. Plus you can still experiment to improve conversion rate by testing different ad variants.

Where can I run lead form ads?

> Facebook
> Instagram
> Google Search
> YouTube
> LinkedIn
> Snapchat

Facebook Lead Ads

With 2.4 billion monthly active users Facebook is still the biggest social media network, and your best bet for running low cost lead generation ads for B2C and even for some B2Bs. Facebook lead ads are available across all devices?and can also be used with dynamic ads, making them ideal for converting browsers of specific products or services into identified leads. Facebook lists more than 600 third party solutions that can be connected to lead ads, including most popular CRMs and marketing automation platforms.

 

Instagram Lead Form Ads

You can target Instagram’s 1 billion monthly active users with lead ads in much the same way as Facebook. However, Instagram lead form ads don’t show on desktop, which is unlikely to cause much of a problem given that the vast majority of users are on mobile. There are also some form field limitations on Instagram that Facebook doesn’t have, such as no support for dynamic ads.

 

Google Search Lead Form Extension

I only learned of the Google Search Lead Form Extension a few weeks ago as it appears to still be in beta and not yet available in all ad accounts. As the name implies, you add the extension to your Google Search campaigns in the same way you would add sitelinks or callouts. Before you get too excited though, I have to tell you that the lead form extension currently only works on iOS and Android mobile devices and tablets, so you can forget capturing leads from desktop searches, smart TVs or any other operating systems. While there may be good technical reasons for this, in my opinion it makes lead form extensions of limited use for now. Despite what Google may say on the subject, I still find that the best leads come from desktop searches and not mobile.

Leads can be downloaded in CSV format from the Google ad manager within 30 days. In truth any leads would be stone cold dead by then anyway! Google currently lacks the easy connectivity with CRMs and other software enjoyed by Facebook. Instead, you have to work with a developer to set up a webhook integration. Alternatively, check out LeadsBridge, a solution that offers no-code third party integrations for Google lead form ads.

As is to be expected, Google prohibits the use of lead form extensions with ads promoting adult, alcohol, gambling, healthcare, medicines or political topics.

 

YouTube Lead Forms in Video Campaigns

YouTube is often overlooked as both a social network and ad platform. However, there is no ignoring its 1.9 billion users – surpassed only by Facebook. YouTube lead forms are available as an option in ‘Trueview for Action’ campaigns, and they share all the device limitations of their Google search ads counterpart. Just to make sure you are really serious, YouTube also insists on a minimum previous spend of US$50,000 or equivalent in your ad account. As with Google search ads, YouTube lead form ads require a cumbersome webhook integration for transferring leads to your CRM or other third party system. Again, LeadsBridge has this covered if you need a simpler solution.

 

LinkedIn Lead Gen Forms

While LinkedIn may ‘only’ have 330 million monthly active users its ad audience targeting is second to none, allowing you to slice and dice by countless demographic and professional criteria. However, costs are high and response rates are low when compared to Google Search or Facebook. But if you’re targeting B2B and you can put an educational spin on your lead gen efforts, then lead generation forms run in either sponsored content or message ads might just work for you.

As with the other networks, you can download leads from the ad platform manually. Linkedn also integrates with a small selection of CRMs and other systems, although not all third party systems are supported equally. The good news is that Zapier, an API connector for a wide range of software solutions, is included. My advice would be to get the leads first and worry about integration when the scale of the problem warrants it.

 

Snapchat Auto-fill for Web View

Strictly speaking, Snapchat lead form feature is actually a landing page. It works like this: when you click on the ad the Snapchat browser opens the landing page and attempts to autofill your details into a specifically crafted landing page that must meet Snapchats’ Web View specification. However, because you never leave the app, it feels like a native experience. The Auto-fill option currently only works with single image or video adverts

 

Platforms where you can’t run lead form ads

Twitter Lead Generation Card

Twitter removed its lead generation card feature at the end of 2016. It seems the format was inconsistent with Twitter’s other ad formats and failed to deliver the performance marketers had hoped for. Now you have to use website cards and send visitors to a landing page instead. I think it would make a lot of sense for Twitter to update and relaunch its lead generation ad format, as there seems to be increasing demand for it.

Reddit, Pinterest and WhatsApp?

Despite their large user bases, Reddit, Pinterest and WhatsApp don’t currently offer lead generation ads with forms. I wouldn’t be surprised to see lead form ads roll out in the next 12 months across all three platforms.

 

Which works best, landing page or lead form ads?

Whether lead form ads or landing pages work best will depend on your situation. According to WordStream, you are likely to experience a higher volume of leads from a lead form ad but they may be of a lower quality than those typically captured by a landing page. The reason for this might be that a lead form does not provide enough information for prospects to ‘de-qualify’ themselves whereas prospects viewing a detailed landing page have a lot more information to assess their suitability for the offer.

My experience to date has been running lead magnet promotions for SaaS products. I typically see leads of a similar quality to landing page prospects but at a reduced cost per lead. For this reason alone I would recommend testing lead form ad variations alongside any campaign which uses a landing page.

 

Time to experiment with lead form ads?

It’s over to you to explore the opportunities presented by lead form ads for yourself. If you’re promoting a B2C/D2C product or service, try Facebook first because of its large audience and low cost. Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube are also worth experimenting with for this audience type. For B2B products or services, LinkedIn is your best bet. However, Facebook and Google Search Lead Extension ads will probably have a lower cost per lead (CPL) as LinkedIn advertising can be expensive. If you are a SaaS or subscription based company looking for help to get started with lead form ads, please get in touch.

Photo credit: Andy Morffew.

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Five SaaS Paid Acquisition Ideas For 2020 http://www.remixcave.com/blog/saas-paid-acquisition-ideas/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/saas-paid-acquisition-ideas/#respond Tue, 03 Dec 2019 01:35:07 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1830 The business case for why software startups should experiment with paid acquisition, plus five SaaS paid acquisition ideas for 2020 and advice on getting started with paid and tips about attribution and assumptions.

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Many bootstrapped SaaS founders are reluctant to invest in paid acquisition, believing it to be something that only the Unicorns can afford. This opinion was further reinforced in 2018 by a high profile tweet from Andrew Chen, general partner at Silicon Valley VC firm Andreessen Horowitz, claiming that many startups are dying from their addiction to paid marketing. While in certain cases this may be true it is also the case that many bootstrapped and angel backed startups are failing because they are not willing to experiment with paid acquisition at all. If that sounds familiar to you, here are some SaaS paid acquisition ideas for you to try in 2020.

What is paid acquisition anyway?

Put simply, paid acquisition channels are those which you have to pay for clicks, leads or other conversions. For a SaaS business the most commonly used paid channels are Google and Bing Search ads, Google display ads, YouTube ads and paid social ads on Facebook, Instagram, Messenger, LinkedIn, Twitter, Quora and Reddit. Also popular are paid directory listings on Capterra, Software Advice, GetApp and G2.

So whether you are bootstrapped or VC backed, startup or established company, here are five reasons for you to consider SaaS paid acquisition as part of your growth strategy in 2020.

Business Case #1: Idea Validation

It’s now been more than a decade since Tim Ferris published The Four Hour Work Week, the book that popularized the concept of setting up a dummy order page and running Google Search ads to gauge interest. Yet founders are still building SaaS products with little or no market validation (build it and they will come syndrome). Instead, start by thinking about what problem you are hoping to solve, and for whom? How would your prospects phrase their search for such a solution? A few hundred dollars spent on driving traffic to a landing page to capture their details and have a conversation could be money well spent to validate your idea before building it.

Business Case #2: Product/Market Fit Validation

How do you know if your SaaS product has product/market fit if no one yet knows about your product? Paid acquisition can be used to test landing pages that emphasis different messaging and features, and measure the effect on the number of free trial signups or demo requests from each page. Unbounce, LeadPages or Google Optimize can be used to give your tests statistical evidence and run A/B tests easily.

Business Case #3: Content and Keyword Validation

While paid acquisition can accelerate the growth of your SaaS product on its own, I would not recommend relying on a single channel or strategy for too long. Yes, paid is expensive but at least the results (good or bad) follow quickly. Imagine investing time and money in content marketing and SEO with no idea whether you are optimizing for the best converting search terms and topics. You don’t have to imagine it, as this is what most companies do! So it actually makes a lot of sense to run paid search ads for a while to work out what are likely to be the best performing keywords for your business. Once you know this, you can invest in content and SEO with confidence that you are not simply guessing what works or just following the competition.

Business Case #4: Growth Maximization

In an ideal world you will have a three or four marketing channels working well for you, driving traffic to your site. But what happens when they visit, leave and forget about you? This is when retargeting campaigns can help maximize the opportunities you have by showing relevant ads on the Google Display Network and across social media. Used wisely, retargeting can convert undecided visitors or at least get them to take the next action in your funnel. As you have already invested a lot of time and money to get visitors to your site, spending a few dollars more to seal the deal with retargeting is well worthwhile. And retargeting campaigns are almost always the lowest cost of acquisition of any type of paid campaign.

Business Case #5: Brand Defense

SaaS is more competitive than ever. For example, in MarTech alone there are now more than 7,000 SaaS products vying for the attention and budgets of marketers. So it’s understandable that companies will try and poach each others’ prospects and customers. One of the ways they do this is by bidding on your name in Google and Bing, and showing their ‘alternative’ ad for your product. Unless you are also bidding on your own product or company name it’s likely you are already losing clicks to your competitors. The good news is that a competitor will find it expensive to compete against you if you run your own brand ads, as Google Ads ‘quality score’ should already be working in your favour.

What you need to know before embarking on paid acquisition

If you want to use paid acquisition to grow your SaaS aggressively, you’ll need to have a good handle on your numbers, specifically deal velocity, CAC (cost of acquisition), LTV (lifetime value) and churn. Monitoring these KPIs as you begin and increase your investment in paid channels will be critical to understanding the effect on your business. Typically an angel or VC backed venture might spend the equivalent of the first year of revenue to acquire a customer. However, bootstrapped founders tend to be more conservative, spending the equivalent of 3 or 4 months of average revenue to acquire a customer.?

Attribution – how much is enough?

Attribution (knowing which customers came from which source) will help you to measure your return on investment and return on advertising spend. I only have one piece of advice regarding this: don’t expect it to be 100% accurate as this is still a fantasy. And due to growing privacy concerns, attribution is actually becoming harder to prove. Instead, try and discern the insights from the data you can collect instead of fretting about what you cannot record. As with many things in life, perfection is the enemy of good.

Don’t assume anything!

I hope this has given you some ideas for how you might use paid acquisition to grow your SaaS business. It’s very easy to make assumptions about a particular tactic or channel not being right for promoting your product but in my experience, you can no longer assume anything without testing and measuring it. Finally, just because you can’t get something to work it doesn’t mean it won’t work. Hire an expert to stand the best chance of succeeding. Dabbling in paid channel acquisition is like learning to play poker in Las Vegas – ultimately a brief and unrewarding experience!

 

Photo credit: Kimberly White/Getty Images for TechCrunch.

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Ep. 47: Reverse Interview with Paul Stephenson of 47 Insights http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-47-reverse-interview-paul-stephenson-47-insights/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-47-reverse-interview-paul-stephenson-47-insights/#respond Mon, 14 Oct 2019 12:00:01 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1763 In this tongue-in-cheek episode SaaS Marketing Insights editor Breandan McGhee interviews 47 Insights Founder & CEO Paul Stephenson on SaaS marketing challenges and the future of this podcast.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 47: Paul Stephenson, 47 Insights

In this tongue-in-cheek episode SaaS Marketing Insights editor Breandan McGhee interviews 47 Insights Founder & CEO Paul Stephenson on SaaS marketing challenges and the future of this podcast.

We want your feedback!

If you like this show or have ideas about how to make it more beneficial to you, please contact us or leave a review on iTunes.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 47 Transcript

To follow…

 

 

 

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-47-reverse-interview-paul-stephenson-47-insights/feed/ 0 In this tongue-in-cheek episode SaaS Marketing Insights editor Breandan McGhee interviews 47 Insights Founder & CEO Paul Stephenson on SaaS marketing challenges and the future of this podcast. In this tongue-in-cheek episode SaaS Marketing Insights editor Breandan McGhee interviews 47 Insights Founder & CEO Paul Stephenson on SaaS marketing challenges and the future of this podcast. 47 Insights yes 45:35
Ep. 46: Maximizing Conversions with Ben Jesson of Conversion Rate Experts http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-46-maximizing-conversions-ben-jesson-conversion-rate-experts/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-46-maximizing-conversions-ben-jesson-conversion-rate-experts/#respond Mon, 23 Sep 2019 12:00:08 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1725 Ben Jesson and fellow co-founder Karl Blanks spawned an industry in 2006 with the creation of conversion rate optimization and its scientific testing methodology. Since then, Conversion Rate Experts has helped many of the leading SaaS companies across the globe to maximize their results. Learn how Ben got started, and what he thinks about the future of SaaS businesses and conversion rate optimization.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 46: Ben Jesson, Conversion Rate Experts

Ben Jesson and fellow co-founder Karl Blanks spawned an industry in 2006 with the creation of conversion rate optimization and its scientific testing methodology. Since then, Conversion Rate Experts has helped many of the leading SaaS companies across the globe to maximize their results. Learn how Ben got started, and what he thinks about the future of SaaS businesses and conversion rate optimization.

Check out the Conversion Rate Experts’ book: Making Websites Win (profits to charity).

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 46 Transcript

To follow…

 

 

 

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-46-maximizing-conversions-ben-jesson-conversion-rate-experts/feed/ 0 Ben Jesson and fellow co-founder Karl Blanks spawned an industry in 2006 with the creation of conversion rate optimization and its scientific testing methodology. Since then, Conversion Rate Experts has helped many of the leading SaaS companies across ... Ben Jesson and fellow co-founder Karl Blanks spawned an industry in 2006 with the creation of conversion rate optimization and its scientific testing methodology. Since then, Conversion Rate Experts has helped many of the leading SaaS companies across the globe to maximize their results. Learn how Ben got started, and what he thinks about the future of SaaS businesses and conversion rate optimization. 47 Insights yes 46:51
Ep. 45: From Engineer to Growth Marketer with Vinima Aggarwal of GetSetGo Marketing http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-45-engineer-growth-marketer-vinima-aggarwal-getsetgo-marketing/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-45-engineer-growth-marketer-vinima-aggarwal-getsetgo-marketing/#respond Mon, 05 Aug 2019 14:09:24 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1539 Starting out as an engineer in Silicon Valley, Indian emigre Vinima Aggarwal has transitioned, via a spell in product management, into a growth marketer with her consultancy, GetSetGo Marketing. In this episode she explains the reasons for the change in her career direction and her experience working in both the US and India.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 45: Vinima Aggarwal, GetSetGo Marketing

Starting out as an engineer in Silicon Valley, Indian emigre Vinima Aggarwal has transitioned, via a spell in product management, into a growth marketer with her consultancy, GetSetGo Marketing. In this episode she explains the reasons for the ?change in her career direction and her experience working in both the US and India.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 45 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-45-engineer-growth-marketer-vinima-aggarwal-getsetgo-marketing/feed/ 0 Starting out as an engineer in Silicon Valley, Indian emigre Vinima Aggarwal has transitioned, via a spell in product management, into a growth marketer with her consultancy, GetSetGo Marketing. In this episode she explains the reasons for the change i... Starting out as an engineer in Silicon Valley, Indian emigre Vinima Aggarwal has transitioned, via a spell in product management, into a growth marketer with her consultancy, GetSetGo Marketing. In this episode she explains the reasons for the change in her career direction and her experience working in both the US and India. 47 Insights yes 19:35
Podcast Transcription Software Review http://www.remixcave.com/blog/podcast-transcription-software-review/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/podcast-transcription-software-review/#comments Fri, 02 Aug 2019 16:38:03 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1487 We tested 6 of the leading podcast transcription software and services available, including Descript, Otter, Rev, Simon Says, Temi and Trint. Learn which performed best.

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When we started our?SaaS Marketing Insights?podcast we didn’t really think about the value of transcribing the audio into text. We assumed there was a service that could do it quickly and easily, and there is. In fact, there are dozens of them. But which service is the best for transcribing podcast audio? We decided to scratch our own itch and find out for ourselves.

Before you read on it’s worth mentioning that, as with all our other blog posts, there are no affiliate links here – our findings are based purely on our testing and own experience. We hope you find what we have learned useful. If you do, please feel free to share it or add a comment at the end of the article.

 

Podcast Transcriptions: why bother?

Transcribing audio podcasts benefits both visitors and search engines alike. Visitors can scan the text quickly, finding the information they’re looking for without having to listen. Search engines can index the transcription and make it accessible to searchers, bring new visitors to your site. You can also use excerpts of the transcription as part of your show promotion.

 

Podcast Transcription Testing Methodology

We took the first 10 minutes of audio from our podcast interview with Rand Fishkin and uploaded it to six leading online transcription services. We then exported the results and compared them to our own manually transcribed version. The excerpt featured both Rand’s? voice (American English) and Paul, our CEO (British English) in a standard podcast interview format, originally recorded over a Zoom video call in MPEG4 audio format then edited and exported as an MP3 file. The audio quality wasn’t first class with one short section affected by a poor internet connection. As such, it is representative of real-life audio podcast quality.

 

Podcast Transcription Software Test Results

Based on feedback from podcasters, we shortlisted six solutions to test. Below is shown an example of our manually transcribed text for comparison with the example we provide for each solution:

Manual Podcast Transcription Example

 


 

Descript

Descript Website

Touted as an AI powered visual editor for audio transcription, Descript is the only solution featured here that requires you to download and install the software. In our tests Descript and Otter performed best out of all the automated software solutions.

Descript Podcast Transcription Example

Price: From 15c per minute, pay as you go.
https://www.descript.com

 


 

Otter

Otter Website

Otter turns voice conversations into written notes. Featuring a web interface (Chrome preferred) Android and iOS apps. It also connects to your Zoom account to automatically transcribe video conversations. Industry leading performance and a freemium business model makes an irresistible combination.

Otter Podcast Transcription Example

Price: 600 minutes’ free transcription per month. Paid options from $8.33 per month (billed annually) for 100 hours per month.
https://otter.ai

 


 

Rev

Rev Website

Rev seems to be considered the gold standard for podcast transcription. Powered by real people rather than AI, the accuracy is excellent. However, this is reflected in the premium price. Turnaround is surprisingly reasonable though – 2 hours for our 10 minute sample file. In our tests Rev’s transcription was more accurate than any AI powered solution, with very few errors.

Rev Podcast Transcription Example

Price: From $1 per minute for human powered transcription.
https://www.rev.com

 


 

Simon Says

Simon Says Website

Simon Says is aimed squarely at audio and video professionals requiring quick transcription. With support for transcribing multiple languages and a plethora of export options supporting many audio and video production software, this solution seems ready for every workflow. However, in our tests the end results were the least accurate, with some of the errors seeming weirdly comical!

Simon Says Podcast Transcription Example

Price: Starting from $15 per hour, pay as you go.
https://simonsays.ai

 


 

Temi

Temi Website

Temi is Rev’s AI powered transcription service, and uses the same interface to manage your transcriptions. It may be one tenth of the price of its human powered counterpart, Rev, however you pay for what you get and in our tests accuracy was not the best.

Temi Podcast Transcription Example

Price: 10c per minute. A free 45 minute trial is available.
https://www.temi.com

 


 

Trint

Trint Website

Another AI based offering, Trint supports input in English and an amazing 27 other languages from a wide range of source file types. While Trint’s export options are second only to Simon Says, it’s Zapier integration opens up a world of possibilities. Which is just as well because it didn’t distinguish itself for accuracy in our tests. iPhone app also available.

Trint Podcast Transcription Example

Price: From $15 per hour, pay as you go.
https://trint.com

 


 

Conclusions & Recommendations

If you want accuracy, and are happy to pay for it then currently Rev is the best of the solutions we tested. However, if you have little or no budget and are happy to spend time making minor corrections we found that both Otter and Descript deliver an equally high level of accuracy. However, they are still inferior to Rev.

 

Descript Otter Rev Simon Says Temi Trint
Cost per min $0.15 $0.00 $1.00 $0.25 $0.10 $0.25
Turnaround
(10 minute audio)
2 mins 3 mins 120 mins 6 mins 5 mins 4 mins
Accuracy 4/5 Star Review Rating 4/5 Star Review Rating 5/5 Star Review Rating 2/5 Star Review Rating 3/5 Star Review Rating 3/5 Star Review Rating
Ease of Use 3/5 Star Review Rating 5/5 Star Review Rating 5/5 Star Review Rating 4/5 Star Review Rating 5/5 Star Review Rating 4/5 Star Review Rating

 

So now we’ve scratched our own itch we have decided to transcribe the rest of our podcast episodes using Otter because of its Zoom integration and 10 hours of free audio transcription per month. Of course, your use case my vary from ours so it’s worthwhile researching a solution that fits your needs. Happy testing!

 

Last updated 1st August 2019.

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Ep. 44: Marketing a SaaS Product Portfolio with Tom Kincheloe of SureSwift Capital http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-44-saas-product-portfolio-marketing-tom-kincheloe-sureswift-capital/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-44-saas-product-portfolio-marketing-tom-kincheloe-sureswift-capital/#respond Mon, 29 Jul 2019 13:49:22 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1467 With more than a decade of experience in online marketing, Tom Kincheloe joined SureSwift Capital as part of the acquisition of B2B SaaS product, MailParser. In this episode Tom explains how he oversees marketing and growth for a portfolio of over 30 online businesses, many of which are SaaS.?

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 44: Tom Kincheloe, SureSwift Capital

With more than a decade of experience in online marketing, Tom Kincheloe joined SureSwift Capital as part of the acquisition of B2B SaaS product, MailParser. In this episode Tom explains how he oversees marketing and growth for a portfolio of over 30 online businesses, many of which are SaaS.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 44 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-44-saas-product-portfolio-marketing-tom-kincheloe-sureswift-capital/feed/ 0 With more than a decade of experience in online marketing, Tom Kincheloe joined SureSwift Capital as part of the acquisition of B2B SaaS product, MailParser. In this episode Tom explains how he oversees marketing and growth for a portfolio of over 30 o... With more than a decade of experience in online marketing, Tom Kincheloe joined SureSwift Capital as part of the acquisition of B2B SaaS product, MailParser. In this episode Tom explains how he oversees marketing and growth for a portfolio of over 30 online businesses, many of which are SaaS.? 47 Insights yes 24:51
Ep. 43: Conversion Copywriting with Laura Lopuch http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-43-conversion-copywriting-with-laura-lopuch/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-43-conversion-copywriting-with-laura-lopuch/#respond Mon, 22 Jul 2019 12:00:13 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1390 Laura Lopuch started out as a litigation paralegal who dreaded making calls. So she developed a knack for writing persuasive ?emails instead. This led her to a new career specializing in emails for SaaS companies. In this episode she explains the dos and don'ts of cold outreach email.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 43: Laura Lopuch, Conversion Copywriter

Laura Lopuch started out as a litigation paralegal who dreaded making calls. So she developed a knack for writing persuasive ?emails instead. This led her to a new career specializing in emails for SaaS companies. In this episode she explains the dos and don’ts of cold outreach email.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-43-conversion-copywriting-with-laura-lopuch/feed/ 0 Laura Lopuch started out as a litigation paralegal who dreaded making calls. So she developed a knack for writing persuasive ?emails instead. This led her to a new career specializing in emails for SaaS companies. Laura Lopuch started out as a litigation paralegal who dreaded making calls. So she developed a knack for writing persuasive ?emails instead. This led her to a new career specializing in emails for SaaS companies. In this episode she explains the dos and don'ts of cold outreach email. 47 Insights yes 29:25
Ep. 42: Conversion Copywriting with Lianna Patch http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-42-conversion-copywriting-lianna-patch/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-42-conversion-copywriting-lianna-patch/#respond Mon, 15 Jul 2019 12:00:07 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1374 Lianna Patch is an experienced conversion copywriter who aims to inject a little humour into every SaaS product she works with. In this episode she outlines how humour in copy can be used as part of coherent client acquisition and retention strategy.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 42: Lianna Patch, Conversion Copywriter

Lianna Patch is an experienced conversion copywriter who aims to inject a little humour into every SaaS product she works with. In this episode she outlines how humour in copy can be used as part of coherent client acquisition and retention strategy.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 42 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-42-conversion-copywriting-lianna-patch/feed/ 0 Lianna Patch is an experienced conversion copywriter who aims to inject a little humour into every SaaS product she works with. In this episode she outlines how humour in copy can be used as part of coherent client acquisition and retention strategy. Lianna Patch is an experienced conversion copywriter who aims to inject a little humour into every SaaS product she works with. In this episode she outlines how humour in copy can be used as part of coherent client acquisition and retention strategy. 47 Insights yes 27:35
Ep. 41: Automating Demos with Greg Dickinson of Omedym http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-41-automating-demos-greg-dickinson-omedym/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-41-automating-demos-greg-dickinson-omedym/#respond Mon, 08 Jul 2019 12:00:11 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1369 A veteran of the tech startup scene, Greg Dickinson spotted a problem with software demos and built a company to solve it. Omedym is a platform that enables prospects to search and find the information they need within a video?demo. Greg explains how his solution works and how he is marketing the product.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 41: Greg Dickinson, Omedym

A veteran of the tech startup scene, Greg Dickinson spotted a problem with software demos and built a company to solve it. Omedym is a platform that enables prospects to search and find the information they need within a video?demo. Greg explains how his solution works and how he is marketing the product.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 41 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-41-automating-demos-greg-dickinson-omedym/feed/ 0 A veteran of the tech startup scene, Greg Dickinson spotted a problem with software demos and built a company to solve it. Omedym is a platform that enables prospects to search and find the information they need within a video?demo. A veteran of the tech startup scene, Greg Dickinson spotted a problem with software demos and built a company to solve it. Omedym is a platform that enables prospects to search and find the information they need within a video?demo. Greg explains how his solution works and how he is marketing the product. 47 Insights yes 26:49
Ep. 40: Conversion Copywriting with Sophia Dagnon http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-40-conversion-copywriting-sophia-dagnon/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-40-conversion-copywriting-sophia-dagnon/#respond Mon, 01 Jul 2019 12:00:31 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1364 After a degree in Archaeology and a move from the UK to the US, Sophia Dagnon started her career writing blog posts for just $2 apiece. This eventually led her into SaaS and conversion copywriting. In this epsiode she oulines her process for getting the best outcome from copy.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 40: Sophia Dagnon, Conversion Copywriter

After a degree in Archaeology and a move from the UK to the US, Sophia Dagnon started her career writing blog posts for just $2 apiece. This eventually led her into SaaS and conversion copywriting. In this epsiode she oulines her process for getting the best outcome from copy.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-40-conversion-copywriting-sophia-dagnon/feed/ 0 After a degree in Archaeology and a move from the UK to the US, Sophia Dagnon started her career writing blog posts for just $2 apiece. This eventually led her into SaaS and conversion copywriting. In this epsiode she oulines her process for getting th... After a degree in Archaeology and a move from the UK to the US, Sophia Dagnon started her career writing blog posts for just $2 apiece. This eventually led her into SaaS and conversion copywriting. In this epsiode she oulines her process for getting the best outcome from copy. 47 Insights yes 26:45
Ep. 39: Ecommerce Automation with Charles Palleschi of Spark Shipping http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-39-ecommerce-automation-charles-palleschi-spark-shipping/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-39-ecommerce-automation-charles-palleschi-spark-shipping/#respond Mon, 24 Jun 2019 12:00:38 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1350 Charles Palleschi always knew he wanted to start his own SaaS business but his route to founding Spark Shipping, an e-commerce automation software solution, was anything but straightforward. In this episode Charles explains the problem his software solves and provides insights into the respective pros and cons of marketing a business in ecommerce or SaaS.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 39: Charles Palleschi, Spark Shipping

Charles Palleschi always knew he wanted to start his own SaaS business but his route to founding Spark Shipping, an e-commerce automation software solution, was anything but straightforward. In this episode Charles explains the problem his software solves and provides insights into the respective pros and cons of marketing a business in ecommerce or SaaS.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 39 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-39-ecommerce-automation-charles-palleschi-spark-shipping/feed/ 0 Charles Palleschi always knew he wanted to start his own SaaS business but his route to founding Spark Shipping, an e-commerce automation software solution, was anything but straightforward. In this episode Charles explains the problem his software sol... Charles Palleschi always knew he wanted to start his own SaaS business but his route to founding Spark Shipping, an e-commerce automation software solution, was anything but straightforward. In this episode Charles explains the problem his software solves and provides insights into the respective pros and cons of marketing a business in ecommerce or SaaS. 47 Insights yes 33:14
Ep. 38: Conversion Copywriting with Patti Haus http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-38-conversion-copywriting-patti-haus/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-38-conversion-copywriting-patti-haus/#respond Mon, 17 Jun 2019 12:00:17 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1346 Patti Haus is a leading conversion copywriter to SaaS companies. In this episode she explains how the conversion copywriting process works, from initial voice of customer research through to the testing of copy on landing pages and email.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 38: Patti Haus, Conversion Copywriter

Patti Haus is a leading conversion copywriter to SaaS companies. In this episode she explains how the conversion copywriting process works, from initial voice of customer research through to the testing of copy on landing pages and email.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 38 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-38-conversion-copywriting-patti-haus/feed/ 0 Patti Haus is a leading conversion copywriter to SaaS companies. In this episode she explains how the conversion copywriting process works, from initial voice of customer research through to the testing of copy on landing pages and email. Patti Haus is a leading conversion copywriter to SaaS companies. In this episode she explains how the conversion copywriting process works, from initial voice of customer research through to the testing of copy on landing pages and email. 47 Insights yes 24:47
Ep. 37: Leading with Outreach with David Horne of CrewPay http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-37-leading-with-outreach-david-horne-crewpay/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-37-leading-with-outreach-david-horne-crewpay/#respond Mon, 10 Jun 2019 15:16:06 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1322 David Horne is a serial entrepreneur with a decade of experience in bootstrapping SaaS products. Along with his co-founders they sought to solve a common shared problem: a simple way to pay independent contractors. The result was CrewPay. David explains how they plan to lead with outreach prior to adopting a multi-channel marketing approach.?

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 37: David Horne, CrewPay

David Horne is a serial entrepreneur with a decade of experience in bootstrapping SaaS products. Along with his co-founders they sought to solve a common shared problem: a simple way to pay independent contractors. The result was CrewPay. David explains how they plan to lead with outreach prior to adopting a multi-channel marketing approach.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 37 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-37-leading-with-outreach-david-horne-crewpay/feed/ 0 David Horne is a serial entrepreneur with a decade of experience in bootstrapping SaaS products. Along with his co-founders they sought to solve a common shared problem: a simple way to pay independent contractors. The result was CrewPay. David Horne is a serial entrepreneur with a decade of experience in bootstrapping SaaS products. Along with his co-founders they sought to solve a common shared problem: a simple way to pay independent contractors. The result was CrewPay. David explains how they plan to lead with outreach prior to adopting a multi-channel marketing approach.? 47 Insights yes 22:03
Ep. 36: App Building for the Rest of Us with Ben Haefele of Foundry Platform http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-36-app-building-ben-haefele-foundry-platform/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-36-app-building-ben-haefele-foundry-platform/#respond Mon, 03 Jun 2019 12:00:15 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1202 Apple's and Google's App Stores launched more than a decade ago and despite their huge popularity, developing a mobile app is still the reserve of the programming elite. Foundry Platform was created to make it easy for anyone to design and build their own app. Co-Founder Ben Haefele explains how the business got started and how it's finding its market.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 36: Ben Haefele, Foundry Platform

Apple’s and Google’s App Stores launched more than a decade ago and despite their huge popularity, developing a mobile app is still the reserve of the programming elite. Foundry Platform was created to make it easy for anyone to design and build their own app. Co-Founder Ben Haefele explains how the business got started and how it’s finding its market.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 36 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-36-app-building-ben-haefele-foundry-platform/feed/ 0 Apple's and Google's App Stores launched more than a decade ago and despite their huge popularity, developing a mobile app is still the reserve of the programming elite. Foundry Platform was created to make it easy for anyone to design and build their ... Apple's and Google's App Stores launched more than a decade ago and despite their huge popularity, developing a mobile app is still the reserve of the programming elite. Foundry Platform was created to make it easy for anyone to design and build their own app. Co-Founder Ben Haefele explains how the business got started and how it's finding its market. 47 Insights yes 19:05
Ep. 35: Crowdsourced Polling with Justin Chen of PickFu http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-35-crowdsourced-polling-justin-chen-pickfu/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-35-crowdsourced-polling-justin-chen-pickfu/#respond Mon, 27 May 2019 14:41:26 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1195 PickFu is a crowdsourced polling platform created by serial bootstrap entrepreneurs Justin Chen and John Li. Although their platform has covers a wide range of possible use cases, Justin explains how they found and deliver value to some key market segments, including self-publishing authors and app creators.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 35: Justin Chen, PickFu

PickFu is a crowdsourced polling platform created by serial bootstrap entrepreneurs Justin Chen and John Li. Although their platform has covers a wide range of possible use cases, Justin explains how they found and deliver value to some key market segments, including self-publishing authors and app creators.

Use code SAASMARKETING for 50% off your first poll.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 35 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-35-crowdsourced-polling-justin-chen-pickfu/feed/ 0 PickFu is a crowdsourced polling platform created by serial bootstrap entrepreneurs Justin Chen and John Li. Although their platform has covers a wide range of possible use cases, Justin explains how they found and deliver value to some key market segm... PickFu is a crowdsourced polling platform created by serial bootstrap entrepreneurs Justin Chen and John Li. Although their platform has covers a wide range of possible use cases, Justin explains how they found and deliver value to some key market segments, including self-publishing authors and app creators. 47 Insights yes 25:39
Ep. 34: Growing Through Cornerstone Content with Christopher Gimmer of Snappa http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-34-cornerstone-content-christopher-gimmer-snappa/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-34-cornerstone-content-christopher-gimmer-snappa/#respond Mon, 20 May 2019 12:00:53 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1185 Snappa is an online?graphic design tool for non-designers that's growing rapidly. Co-founder Christopher Gimmer explains the unlikely origins and how growth has been fuelled by close attention to developing and promoting cornerstone content.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 34: Christopher Gimmer, Snappa

Snappa is an online?graphic design tool for non-designers that’s growing rapidly. Co-founder Christopher Gimmer explains the unlikely origins and how growth has been fuelled by close attention to developing and promoting cornerstone content.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 34 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-34-cornerstone-content-christopher-gimmer-snappa/feed/ 0 Snappa is an online?graphic design tool for non-designers that's growing rapidly. Co-founder Christopher Gimmer explains the unlikely origins and how growth has been fuelled by close attention to developing and promoting cornerstone content. Snappa is an online?graphic design tool for non-designers that's growing rapidly. Co-founder Christopher Gimmer explains the unlikely origins and how growth has been fuelled by close attention to developing and promoting cornerstone content. 47 Insights yes 21:16
Ep. 33: Incentive Marketing with Jack Paxton of Vyper http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-33-incentive-marketing-jack-paxton-vyper/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-33-incentive-marketing-jack-paxton-vyper/#respond Mon, 13 May 2019 12:00:20 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1176 In the course of running Facebook and Google ads for client campaigns, Jack Paxton discovered contest and giveaway promotions generated the best ROI. To be able to deliver results at scale he and co-founder Kevin Tang created Vyper, a SaaS that makes easy to run viral campaigns. Learn Jack's tips for how to run incentivized marketing programs.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 33: Jack Paxton, Vyper

In the course of running Facebook and Google ads for client campaigns, Jack Paxton discovered contest and giveaway promotions generated the best ROI. To be able to deliver results at scale he and co-founder Kevin Tang created Vyper, a SaaS that makes easy to run viral campaigns. Learn Jack’s tips for how to run incentivized marketing programs.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 33 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-33-incentive-marketing-jack-paxton-vyper/feed/ 0 In the course of running Facebook and Google ads for client campaigns, Jack Paxton discovered contest and giveaway promotions generated the best ROI. To be able to deliver results at scale he and co-founder Kevin Tang created Vyper, In the course of running Facebook and Google ads for client campaigns, Jack Paxton discovered contest and giveaway promotions generated the best ROI. To be able to deliver results at scale he and co-founder Kevin Tang created Vyper, a SaaS that makes easy to run viral campaigns. Learn Jack's tips for how to run incentivized marketing programs. 47 Insights yes 18:32
Ep. 32: Event Marketing with Vasil Azarov of Growth Marketing Conference http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-32-event-marketing-vasil-azarov-growth-marketing-conference/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-32-event-marketing-vasil-azarov-growth-marketing-conference/#respond Mon, 06 May 2019 12:00:24 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1166 Vasil Azarov already had a background in event marketing so he knew what to expect when he launched his own Growth Marketing Conference in 2015. What advice would he give marketers looking to achieve more with event marketing, either as event participants, sponsors or first-time event organizers?

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 32: Vasil Azarov, Growth Marketing Conference

Vasil Azarov already had a background in event marketing so he knew what to expect when he launched his own Growth Marketing Conference in 2015. What advice would he give marketers looking to achieve more with event marketing, either as event participants, sponsors or first-time event organizers?

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 32 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-32-event-marketing-vasil-azarov-growth-marketing-conference/feed/ 0 Vasil Azarov already had a background in event marketing so he knew what to expect when he launched his own Growth Marketing Conference in 2015. What advice would he give marketers looking to achieve more with event marketing, Vasil Azarov already had a background in event marketing so he knew what to expect when he launched his own Growth Marketing Conference in 2015. What advice would he give marketers looking to achieve more with event marketing, either as event participants, sponsors or first-time event organizers? 47 Insights yes 24:26
Ep. 31: Marketing A SaaS Startup Stack with Geoff Roberts of Outseta http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-31-marketing-saas-startup-stack-geoff-roberts-outseta/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-31-marketing-saas-startup-stack-geoff-roberts-outseta/#comments Mon, 29 Apr 2019 12:00:11 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1157 Geoff Roberts and his fellow Co-Founders at Outseta are building a complete platform catering for SaaS startups. Although they are only 2.5 years into their journey they are already gaining traction due to their decision to start marketing at the same as they started coding.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 31: Geoff Roberts, Outseta

Geoff Roberts and his fellow Co-Founders at Outseta are building a complete platform catering for SaaS startups. Although they are only 2.5 years into their journey they are already gaining traction due to their decision to start marketing at the same as they started coding.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 31 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-31-marketing-saas-startup-stack-geoff-roberts-outseta/feed/ 1 Geoff Roberts and his fellow Co-Founders at Outseta are building a complete platform catering for SaaS startups. Although they are only 2.5 years into their journey they are already gaining traction due to their decision to start marketing at the same ... Geoff Roberts and his fellow Co-Founders at Outseta are building a complete platform catering for SaaS startups. Although they are only 2.5 years into their journey they are already gaining traction due to their decision to start marketing at the same as they started coding. 47 Insights yes 18:51
Ep. 30: Finding Market Fit with Jonathan Zacks of GoReminders http://www.remixcave.com/blog/finding-market-fit-jonathan-zacks-goreminders/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/finding-market-fit-jonathan-zacks-goreminders/#respond Mon, 22 Apr 2019 12:00:45 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1146 Jonathan Zacks and fellow Co-Founder Justin Svrcek set out to solve the problem of reminders for medical appointments but along the way they came across a slew of other sectors from tattoo parlours to accountants and law firms. How are they managing to acquire customers and differentiate GoReminders in a crowded market?

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 30: Jonathan Zacks, GoReminders

Jonathan Zacks and fellow Co-Founder Justin Svrcek set out to solve the problem of reminders for medical appointments but along the way they came across a slew of other sectors from tattoo parlours to accountants and law firms. How are they managing to acquire customers and differentiate GoReminders in a crowded market?

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 30 Transcript

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/finding-market-fit-jonathan-zacks-goreminders/feed/ 0 Jonathan Zacks and fellow Co-Founder Justin Svrcek set out to solve the problem of reminders for medical appointments but along the way they came across a slew of other sectors from tattoo parlours to accountants and law firms. Jonathan Zacks and fellow Co-Founder Justin Svrcek set out to solve the problem of reminders for medical appointments but along the way they came across a slew of other sectors from tattoo parlours to accountants and law firms. How are they managing to acquire customers and differentiate GoReminders in a crowded market? 47 Insights yes 20:55
Ep. 29: Bootstrapped Brand Building with Patrick Campbell of ProfitWell http://www.remixcave.com/blog/bootstrapped-brand-building-patrick-campbell-profitwell/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/bootstrapped-brand-building-patrick-campbell-profitwell/#respond Mon, 08 Apr 2019 12:00:01 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1134 Patrick Campbell started his career as a US Intelligence Analyst before a stint at Google. In 2012 he co-founded Price Intelligently (now ProfitWell), a bootstrapped company on a quest to understand how SaaS and subscription businesses can maximize financial performance. ProfitWell is now investing heavily in brand building and content marketing. In this episode Patrick reveals their thinking behind this approach.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 29: Patrick Campbell, ProfitWell

Patrick Campbell started his career as a US Intelligence Analyst before a stint at Google. In 2012 he co-founded Price Intelligently (now ProfitWell), a bootstrapped company on a quest to understand how SaaS and subscription businesses can maximize financial performance. ProfitWell is now investing heavily in brand building and content marketing. In this episode Patrick reveals their thinking behind this approach.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 29 Transcript

To follow…

The post Ep. 29: Bootstrapped Brand Building with Patrick Campbell of ProfitWell appeared first on 47 Insights.

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/bootstrapped-brand-building-patrick-campbell-profitwell/feed/ 0 Patrick Campbell started his career as a US Intelligence Analyst before a stint at Google. In 2012 he co-founded Price Intelligently (now ProfitWell), a bootstrapped company on a quest to understand how SaaS and subscription businesses can maximize fin... Patrick Campbell started his career as a US Intelligence Analyst before a stint at Google. In 2012 he co-founded Price Intelligently (now ProfitWell), a bootstrapped company on a quest to understand how SaaS and subscription businesses can maximize financial performance. ProfitWell is now investing heavily in brand building and content marketing. In this episode Patrick reveals their thinking behind this approach. 47 Insights yes 24:40
Ep. 28: Creative Project Management with Corina Ludwig of FunctionFox http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-28-creative-project-management-corina-ludwig-functionfox/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-28-creative-project-management-corina-ludwig-functionfox/#respond Mon, 01 Apr 2019 12:00:17 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1116 Corina Ludwig started her career as a Graphic Designer before transitioning to an Advertising Traffic Manager. She is now President of FunctionFox, a veteran SaaS project management solution catering for advertising, design and marketing agencies as well as inhouse creative teams. How has FunctionFox and its marketing changed in the last 20 years?

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 28: Corina Ludwig, FunctionFox

Corina Ludwig started her career as a Graphic Designer before transitioning to an Advertising Traffic Manager. She is now President of FunctionFox, a veteran SaaS project management solution catering for advertising, design and marketing agencies as well as inhouse creative teams. How has FunctionFox and its marketing changed in the last 20 years?

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 28 Transcript

To follow…

The post Ep. 28: Creative Project Management with Corina Ludwig of FunctionFox appeared first on 47 Insights.

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-28-creative-project-management-corina-ludwig-functionfox/feed/ 0 Corina Ludwig started her career as a Graphic Designer before transitioning to an Advertising Traffic Manager. She is now President of FunctionFox, a veteran SaaS project management solution catering for advertising, Corina Ludwig started her career as a Graphic Designer before transitioning to an Advertising Traffic Manager. She is now President of FunctionFox, a veteran SaaS project management solution catering for advertising, design and marketing agencies as well as inhouse creative teams. How has FunctionFox and its marketing changed in the last 20 years? 47 Insights yes 17:36
Ep. 27: Customer Success with Anthony Kennada of Gainsight http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-27-customer-success-anthony-kennada-gainsight/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-27-customer-success-anthony-kennada-gainsight/#respond Mon, 25 Mar 2019 12:00:14 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1105 From starting as a tech recruiter in 2008, Anthony Kennada quickly switched into marketing and hasn't looked back since. Now as CMO of Gainsight he has been instrumental in shaping the customer success category using a combination of brand, content and community marketing.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 27: Anthony Kennada, Gainsight

From starting as a tech recruiter in 2008, Anthony Kennada quickly switched into marketing and hasn’t looked back since. Now as CMO of Gainsight he has been instrumental in shaping the customer success category using a combination of brand, content and community marketing.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 27 Transcript

To follow…

The post Ep. 27: Customer Success with Anthony Kennada of Gainsight appeared first on 47 Insights.

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-27-customer-success-anthony-kennada-gainsight/feed/ 0 From starting as a tech recruiter in 2008, Anthony Kennada quickly switched into marketing and hasn't looked back since. Now as CMO of Gainsight he has been instrumental in shaping the customer success category using a combination of brand, From starting as a tech recruiter in 2008, Anthony Kennada quickly switched into marketing and hasn't looked back since. Now as CMO of Gainsight he has been instrumental in shaping the customer success category using a combination of brand, content and community marketing. 47 Insights yes 18:53
Ep. 26: Breaking Down Operational Silos with Jason Reichl of Go Nimbly http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-26-breaking-down-operational-silos-jason-reichl-go-nimbly/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-26-breaking-down-operational-silos-jason-reichl-go-nimbly/#respond Mon, 18 Mar 2019 12:00:14 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1095 Jason Reichl, Co-Founder and CEO of subscription based revenue operations consultancy Go Nimbly is on a mission to break down the operational silos that still exist between Sales, Marketing and Customer Success, and explains how these functions can be effectively outsourced.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 26: Jason Reichl, Go Nimbly

Jason Reichl, Co-Founder and CEO of subscription based revenue operations consultancy Go Nimbly is on a mission to break down the operational silos that still exist between Sales, Marketing and Customer Success, and explains how these functions can be effectively outsourced.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 26 Transcript

Paul: On today’s show I have an interview with Jason Reichl, CEO of Go Nimbly, hope you enjoy it.

Okay, i’m here with Jason Reichl, CEO at Go Nimbly. And, Jason, can you explain to anyone who doesn’t know yet? Just what Go Nimbly is? Because you’re a new kind of operation?

Jason: That’s correct. So we are the world’s first, as far as I know, but the world’s first revenue operation consultancy?

Paul: Can I stop you there, what does that mean?

Jason: It means that we use a very specific, generalist approached to Operations, centered around a couple of skills, which we can get into later. But mostly it means breaking down silos in organisations. So we really focus on either acting as or transforming organisations into being a new kind of model, a revenue operations. So I like to liken it to going from traditional development to agile development or going from manufacturing to lean manufacturing. So revenue operations is this idea of a centralised operations team that doesn’t report to say the head of sales or marketing, but directly the COO or CRO or CEO, and they’re focused on one thing, which is driving revenue for the company.

Paul: Okay, so it’s mostly sales, marketing?

Jason: Yeah, so if you think about your standard, go to market team being sales, marketing, customer success, maybe some people consider finance, part of that is to interact with the customer, that front end thing, that front end team, which we call the go to market team is your front end UI, the customer, right? The revenue operations team is the supporting function that supports that team holistically. So instead of having sales operations, marketing operation and customer success operations, you would just have revenue operations, and that team would take care of all of the operations for the business.

Paul: And you’re just doing this just for SaaS businesses?

Jason: Just for SaaS and PaaS companies. Because of the dynamic nature of SaaS and PaaS businesses, their operations need to be very flexible and moving, basically, for each milestone that they might go through in their their company’s trajectory. And because of that revenue operations makes the most sense. Any organisation should adopt it. I think, you know, 15 years from now, you’ll be seeing Coca Cola going through a transformation revenue operations. But it’s just we’re in a marketplace. And we get to experience this and change companies rapidly. And so we focused on that niche at Go Nimbly,

Paul: So we’re based here or we’re in your offices here in San Francisco. Correct. So I guess you working with a lot of companies in the valley, do you want to tell us some of the names, people we’re working with.

Jason: Sure, so we have offices in New York and here in San Francisco. And we’re primarily working with large enterprise SaaS companies right now. So Zendesk, Twilio, PagerDuty, those kinds of organisations, we focus primarily on stage C to IPO companies, really, when operations become a key value differentiator for your organisation. We want to be the default consultancy for all SaaS companies. But just because of the structure of it right now, we’re kind of focused on on that area right now.

Paul: So you must see, working with a range of SaaS businesses a whole bunch of different challenges. You know, they’re in different vertical sectors and industries. But you must see these repeated patterns of challenges. So how do you guys step in and get to understand a market that one of your clients is in and help to solve the challenges for them?

Jason: Yeah, I mean, I think the main thing to understand is a lot of the companies that we work with are after the same milestones from a business perspective, right. And we have always been pretty data driven here at Go Nimbly, so we know if you’re going from stage B to stage C, you’re probably going to scale your marketing team. And because you’re going to scale your marketing team, you’re going to need to these operational work streams, we don’t use the term projects, because we don’t think of it as a single thing. It’s an ongoing thing. Go nimble is actually a subscription based consultancy. So very much like the SaaS model they pay monthly.

Paul: So you match your model…

Jason: With the customers, right. Yeah, exactly. So that we understand all the pains they feel for that model, but also all the advantages that they have as well. And so we’ll help them move from one major milestone to another, say scaling their marketing team and setting up all the infrastructure, process tools, enablement and insights necessary to really scale your marketing, for example, in that b2c space that you might be in. If you’re going to IPO, it’s really about helping them become Sox compliant, and other things like that. So as far as where we map, we map these projects to where they are as an organisation.

To understand their specific business, we actually deploy a team of revenue operations consultants to them, and they actually act as if they operate that company. So we manage right now about 216 million dollars a month of reoccurring revenue for our customers. So that makes us… we’re managing around $2 billion. It makes us the largest operator of SaaS business in the valley, if not the world. So for us, it’s really about understanding how these organisations need to grow where they need to invest. You know, there’s a lot of smart people here, obviously. But I think the one of the key things that we realised is, even if you get a world class operator in and say that the CEO or the you know, they’re your operations person, the chances that they’ve seen sales, territory management, at where you are, as an organisation is probably, they probably touched it about four years ago, right.

We are doing that work stream constantly for, you know, last 18 months, we’ve seen pretty much every word stream four to five times. And so we have the ability to be very up to date, whereas the even if you hire someone who’s very, very operationally sound, there’s going to be that lag time, right and in the environment that we exist in with SaaS companies. That lag time can cost you a lot of competitive advantage, right. And I think what we’re always trying to do is make sure that we are maximising the potential spend LTV of every single prospect that our customer converts. So you know, one of the things that we’ve noticed is when you’re a traditional operations company just siloed into these individual silos, maybe you are, you know, you have your KPIs, if you’re marketing Ops, you’re trying to increase open rates or whatever you’re trying to do. Sales, you’re trying to increase pipeline. All that’s fine. But what ends up happening is that operation team as a whole only has about 10% impact to the revenue of the of the customer. So that kind of means a standard operations team, the way that we look at a standard operations team is if they stopped hireing sales and marketing people and operators just did their job. If you’re a $1 million company, one year later, you would gain 10%, right?

Because you’re gotten more efficiencies down, you scaled your customers, you’ve cross sell properly done all these operational things with revenue operations, because that’s one team and all they care about is a revenue impact, you can see about 36% increase. And so that’s the Delta, what we tell people that delta between 10% and 36%, is because you’ve taken your eye off the personalization of the customer, because you have your teams operate in silos, and they fill the gaps, so they don’t spend as much. So that’s kind of what we’re trying to eliminate. We’re trying to eliminate the gaps customers feel through operations. So I’m trying to turn operations into a revenue source instead of a cost reduction centre or worse, you know, viewed as a cost centre to an organisation.

Paul: Absolutely. So you’re one of two Co founders is that right?

Jason: Yes, There’s two Co founders and three partners. So there’s five of us on the leadership board.

Paul: So how did you get started in the world of SaaS? And you mentioned earlier that you started out in marketing, right?

Jason: Yes, I started out in marketing. And very quickly, just kind of fell in love with tech. And I was working at a company called Rackspace based in San Antonio. And while I was working there, I worked on the first redundant server cluster, which was would become what Salesforce is built upon, which would become basically the cloud, right. And I was like, this is really interesting, I’m very interested in it. And I ended up working as a consultant at a SI of Salesforce’s for about 10 years and running very large delivery teams, but always really focused on the idea of, you know, marketing, sales, buyer experience. And, you know, I came out to Silicon Valley started an arm of that business out here and got seduced by my love of marketing and product, I ended up becoming a product manager, became a VP of product, at a couple of Salesforce back companies.

And then while I was there, I was like, man, I really love doing this product stuff. But I kept having this nagging feeling that, you know, the companies that I worked for had great products, but they didn’t have great businesses. And I was like, man, I would hate to see this product not exist in the marketplace. Because we don’t know how to operate. We don’t know how to scale our sales team, we don’t know how to market this properly. And so I was like, I think there is a little bit of a need for me to use my skills and understand how to operate these businesses at scale, and kind of show these organisations how to operate their business, because I want them focused on building amazing product. If you go to SaaSter, or any of these kind of events, they’ll often say, like, hey, the fact that you’re in this room probably means you have an amazing product, but how you operate your business is actually going to be the difference between, you know, the success you want and the success you could have.

I think that’s a really important message. And you know, and there’s a lot of things changing in Silicon Valley right now, you know, I think when I started 10 years ago, in this in a space, you know, the average age of a startup founder was, you know, 26 or 27. And now it’s 33-34. And I think what’s happening is, uh, it’s not their first go around, maybe they’ve had something that failed, or maybe they just know they could do better. And so they’re more open to these ideas of operating more successfully than they ever were before.

Paul: Yeah, I think everybody sort of knows what the ground rules are now, you know, SaaS is a relatively young industry, isn’t it, you know, as a delivery mechanism. 20 years for the software. But yeah, subscriptions go way back. And, and so we’re all standing on the shoulders of giants, and learning.

Jason: And everybody wants to be the next Salesforce. You know, and I think that the pressure is so much higher than it’s ever been for these organisations.

Paul: Yeah. Yeah. Especially with investors.

Jason: Yes, absolutely.

Paul: Everyone wants a return and they want it yesterday.

Jason: Yeah. And, you know, we work with a couple of VC firms, and we see even they’re taking, spending the same amount of money but willing to, you know, diversify it across more companies. So that means you’re not going to get as much so you don’t, as a SaaS company, you don’t have as much ability to waste. You don’t have much ability to just rely on growth numbers to really push you forward. Right, you need to show that you can operate this business.

Paul: Yeah, it’s got to be efficient. So how long has Go Nimbly been operating?

Jason: Yeah, so we’ve been operating for five years. But in this model for the last three. We’ve seen since we’ve adopted this model, 100%, year over year growth, this is the first year that we actually marketing the company, it’s been all referral based up until that point.

Paul: All word of mouth.

Jason: Yeah. And I think there’s a better way to do this. And so we’re starting to market the company. And we expect to double again next year, and hopefully continue to do that for the next couple of years.

Paul: So what do you see? You know… you’re one of the players in this market. How do you see what you’re doing changing the way that SaaS businesses operate going forward? Being a lot leaner, meaner, outsourcing robots. Do you see any other big changes?

Jason: Well, I think, in general, this is my bold statement, there’s gonna be people who are obviously watching this or listening to it are going to go, this will never happen. But I think that it’s a very real possibility that 25 years from now, companies will not think twice about BPO’ing out their entire operations, everything to a company like Go Nimbly. Who want essentially, to know that it’s being run well, and know that all this kind of stuff is being implemented, and it’s at the right place in time to scale it. And so my big bet is that you’re going to see a lot more BPO offerings emerge in the marketplace, a lot more of like core competencies, you see this already in accounting, and you see, you know, Atrium, you know, in the law, firm tech space, you see a lot of these organisations that are really service companies.

So if I really made a bet, I’m going to think that… we’re going to see a big investment and a big wave in technology enabled service companies, who, you know, you see it with Uber and all these other companies are for the consumer side, usually the consumer side, is, is an indicator of what’s going to happen on the B2B side, right? And so if I can provide the same kind of experience at much cheaper and much higher scale, I think that a lot more organisations will really take seriously BPO’ing or using this service company to run major parts of their business.

Paul: Yeah, so yeah, it’s just all about efficiency, and they can see there’s an opportunity to to make it more efficient.

Jason: It’s about efficiency. But I think really, what it’s about is allowing them to focus on the core of what they’re good at, right? I’ve not met a CEO at a SaaS company that wakes up every day passionate about the operations of their systems processes, you know, and so when you look at that side, you want the people who are passionate about that to be doing that work, right. And it’s not something where… I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen someone in marketing as soon as they’re able, leave marketing and go work on the product. Right. And that’s because in those organisations, it’s not really as sexy to be part of the operating mechanics of it. And I think that you need those people who do believe and who find that job to be sexy, right. And, you know, everyone at Go Nimbly at their heart are an analytical nerd, who, you know, really wants to make these companies operate better, because we feel like our job is to make the workflow of our customers more enjoyable, right? It’s more enjoyable to have to work be less hard, less cumbersome, and get more return out of it. Everyone’s enjoying themselves a little bit more.

Paul: Yeah, they constraint on the stuff that they’re good at. You deliver the stuff you need to do for them. And the end result it’s more efficient but everyone’s happier as well.

Jason: Yes. Happiness is, is very important here in Silicon Valley.

Paul: Cool. So how do you see that interface? You know, the role changing? Because I know you guys, you got a chief revenue officer here, right?

Jason: Correct.

Paul: How do you see, you know, this BPO movement, changing the way that the organisations and the service interface?

Jason: Well, the first thing that I think that we have to sort of acknowledge is, you know, yes, subscription model, yes, SaaS companies, all that’s relatively new in the marketplace. But all of our businesses are still built on this very traditional idea of siloing the organisation into these very strict departments, right. Lets just do marketing and sales as an example, so we don’t name everything. You have marketing and sales. And, if you do a Google search, the first thing you’ll see is misalignment come up and you know the word hand off, which I don’t really believe in and all of these kind of things…

Paul: Artificial barriers.

Jason: Artificial barriers, but your customer doesn’t want any of that.

Paul: They don’t understand it, they don’t care.

Jason: In the B2C space, customers demand all this level of personalization, right? In the B2B space, we act like they have to, you know, they have to be exposed to how the sausage is made all the time. And I think what’s really interesting about the silos is, you know, we have the ability in the tech space to break those down through technology and process training, actually using data. And yet we don’t and so I think the big question is, why are we so… it’s probably natural for us to want to silo, there’s a lot of, you know… if you go back in history and kind of look at the story of the silo syndrome and where it comes from, it’s pretty natural for us to want to do these things, because we want to be told we’re good, and we have to rely on a bunch of other people, it’s actually very difficult to get that same result. And so there’s a lot of advantages for the silo. But the the main disadvantage is that you can’t grow your organisation and you can’t become, you know, you can’t steer it in the way that you want to. There’s too many individual boats, right, it’s really hard to push it towards towards this goal.

Paul: It’s like a flotilla of ships.

Jason: Exactly right. And so ultimately, what we’re trying to accomplish is sort of narrow that down to one Northstar that everyone can drive on, which is what we think is should be revenue, right? Everything around the organisation is around that and everything becomes, from metrics to indicators, right? So all the marketing metrics and stuff that we used to care about the outcome indicators are we pointed in the right direction were we are still moving forward, but the entire organisation can move towards this one thing, once you have that piece where the organisation can move towards one thing, it’s much easier to add on things like Go Nimbly, or, you know, other services, because it’s easy to point those in a direction, it’s even easier to hire people to even easier to use other services, it’s easier to, you know, bring contractors on, it’s just, it’s much more fluid, and you can actually move much faster.

I find that a lot of organisations, you know, take a very specific, tangible, tactical thing. They want to trust their data, but they know that their data is bad. So they can’t trust their reports, right. And you just look at that and you go, Okay, so you can deploy that across the board. Lots of companies want to work with Go Nimbly, but they feel like they couldn’t take advantage of our holistic offering, because they’re so solid, because they’re so broken right now. Right? And when do we make that transition to Okay, we are going to move forward. And we are going to point ourselves in this direction and kind of align all the ships, all the boats, right?

So I think that, you know, one key thing that’s happening in the industry is things like CRO coming up, because that was the original question, right. And with the CRO coming up, what we’re actually saying is, we’re actually going to put someone who is a generalist, you know, Chief revenue officer is going to be kind of in charge of sales and marketing, they’re going to be in charge of revenue as a product, they’re gonna be in charge, ultimately, hopefully, over the operations piece of that. And they’re going to manage this in a more generalised fashion. When you do that, then what you have to do is pick things that are in common between all those silos, right? And as soon as you do that, you start getting cross functionality built into your silos, which then change your entire organisation, alignment happens, right?

The reason the alignment doesn’t happen is because you’re not aligned. And I think people think like, Oh, we are aligned, because we all want X product to be the best product in the world. And that’s really not enough from a day to day perspective, it’s hard to understand how jobs tied to that. So I kind of see these sort of roles that are generalists getting more status, right, and people looking for them. And you know, a lot of times, people have this very clear idea of a CRO. And what they’ll end up doing is just promoting their best sales person to CRO, and they actually won’t know how to operate. They actually won’t know anything about marketing. And then the marketing team kind of is still over here. Right?

So there’s still a little bit of posturing right now, because people don’t know, I read the state of revenue operations, which is a guide they released, and it said that 46% of SaaS companies are trying to make transition to revenue operations as a framework. But of those 46%, 76% of them were failing, because they didn’t know how to do it. Right. And so, you know, we’re in a very dangerous place where people are hearing, oh, there’s a better way to operate. But there’s not enough people who know how to operate that way to actually guide people the right way. Right. And so all these companies are going to try this and they’re going to fail. And, you know, I don’t want… my fear as Go Nimbly is, I don’t want revenue operations, which is really a transformational operating framework to be tied to people who don’t know how to do it. Because there’s not enough information out there right now.

So that’s why I’m doing podcasts like this, so that we can talk about it so that people start to understand, oh, there are companies that know the how of this, not that there’s a transformational need. Not that we’re trying to break down silos, which is… I’ve never met someone who says, No, it’s not true. But really, there is a how, and there is a practical way of doing it. And so I think what I’m trying to do with Go Nimbly is paint that picture of how companies do it because I honestly don’t care if you use Go Nimbly. I think of us as a doctor, if the problem is severe enough, you’re going to come to us, we know how to fix it. We know how to build long term partnerships with you. But ultimately, all businesses from day one, when you’re in a Wework you should be using this framework from day one on how you can operate your company, it will save you so much money, it will save you… if you’re a founder, it will save you giving away parts of your company that you don’t have to give away.

Paul: Yeah that’s worth alot.

Jason: Yeah, so I think that’s what’s changing. I see a lot of people eager jump on I see the CRO title being one of those things that someone’s eager to jump on to, because it’s easy to create a title and put a job posting out there in the world. But there’s still a lot of lack of meaning right now and definition. And so I think that we will see in the next 12 to 13 months… maybe 18 months. I think what we’ll start to see is just more definition coming into the how. What is actually the job of a CRO? What is actually the function of revenue operations team, how do they operate? Who do they report to? You know, I get all the time, do they report to marketing or they report to sales. And I’m like, well, whoever has the closest relationship to the customer, and you know, wants to make that happen. That’s who they should report to. Because ultimately, everyone should be working in service of the customer.

Paul: Absolutely, Jason that is a fantastic summary about what you guys do. I know you’re a bit jet lagged.

Jason: Yeah.

Paul: But I think you explained that very well. Thank you very much for your time. I really appreciate getting to the bottom of what revenue operations is all about.

Jason: I’m glad you were able to do it so quickly. Thank you.

Paul: I hope you enjoyed my conversation with Jason. For more info on Go Nimbly, please visit gonimbly.com. For more info about this show, and to get our links to iTunes, Google Play SoundCloud, Stitcher and YouTube, check out www.remixcave.com. And if you have any SaaS marketing insights that you’d like to share on the show, please get in touch. Until next time,

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-26-breaking-down-operational-silos-jason-reichl-go-nimbly/feed/ 0 Jason Reichl, Co-Founder and CEO of subscription based revenue operations consultancy Go Nimbly is on a mission to break down the operational silos that still exist between Sales, Marketing and Customer Success, Jason Reichl, Co-Founder and CEO of subscription based revenue operations consultancy Go Nimbly is on a mission to break down the operational silos that still exist between Sales, Marketing and Customer Success, and explains how these functions can be effectively outsourced. 47 Insights yes 22:59
SaaS Conferences 2019 http://www.remixcave.com/blog/saas-conferences-2019/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/saas-conferences-2019/#comments Wed, 02 Jan 2019 02:30:02 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1017 View our list of 2019's SaaS conferences and related events. Subscribe to our SaaS Conferences 2019 Google Calendar or download the events in iCal format...

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Working in SaaS marketing can be a lonely business with long working hours. But it’s no good earning without learning. So make sure you’re investing in yourself in 2019 by attending SaaS conferences and other marketing events that will both educate and motivate you.

Want to keep up to date with SaaS events? Subscribe to the SaaS Conferences in Google Calendar and we’ll update the events for you for 2019 and beyond! You can also download all 2019’s SaaS conferences in iCal format.

All ticket prices are shown in US dollars unless otherwise indicated. Prices are correct at time of publication but are subject to change.

Google Calendar ? iCal

 

February 2019

SaaStr Annual 2019
Feb 5-7 (2019-02-05), San Jose, USA
Probably the most important SaaS event of the year, founded by industry veteran Jason M Lemkin. Tickets from $999.

Startup Grind Global Conference 2019
Feb 12-13 (2019-02-13),?Redwood City, USA
While not strictly SaaS only, this conference is suited for entrepreneurs looking for the inspiration to take their side-hustle mainstream. Tickets from $355.

Traffic & Conversion Summit 2019
Feb 25-27 (2019-02-25), San Diego, USA
Boasting more than 6,000 attendees, 100 sessions and 8o speakers, this three-day event is aimed at digital marketing professionals, agencies, consultants and entrepreneurs.

 

March 2019

SXSW
March 8-16 (2019-03-08),?Austin, USA
Category defying event where creativity goes to meet money, and vice versa. Tickets from $495.

TOPO Summit
March 17-18 (2019-03-17),?San Francisco, USA
Sales and marketing focussed summit organized by ‘Account Based Everything’ research and advisory firm TOPO. Tickets from $995.

MicroConf 2019
March 24-28 (2019-03-24), Las Vegas, USA
Aimed squarely at founders who are looking to start a bootstrapped SaaS or those that already have and are now looking to grow it. Tickets from $699.

SaaS Connect
March 26-27 (2019-03-26),?San Francisco, USA
Formerly The Small Business Web Summit, 2018 will be the 8th annual summit of The Cloud Software Association. Tickets from $459.

 

April 2019

LTV Conf 2019
April 3-4 (2019-04-04),?New York, USA
“Europe’s leading annual SaaS conference” relocates to New York for 2019 after three years in London. Tickets from $499.

Business of Software Europe
April 11-12 (2019-04-11), Cambridge, UK
Business of Software Conference expands to Cambridge, UK, the ‘Silicon Fen’. Expect around 200 software entrepreneurs keen to learn from each other. Tickets from £625.

Growth Marketing Conference Toronto
April 25 (2019-04-25), Toronto, Canada
Vasil Azarov takes his popular Silicon Valley conference north to Canada, with content covering SaaS, B2B and B2C. Tickets from CA$495.

Recurring Revenue Conference 2019
April 30 – May 1 (2019-04-30),?Marina Del Rey, USA
Organized by Sutton Capital Partners, this conference is focussed on how SaaS and consumer subscription companies can maximize value and ultimately company valuation. Tickets from $199.

 

May 2019

Technology Services World San Diego 2019
May 6-8 (2019-05-06),?San Diego, USA
The annual conference organized by the Technology Services Industry Association (TSIA). Tickets from $995.

SaaS Monster (Toronto)
May 20 – May 23 (2019-05-20),?Toronto, Canada
Billed as the World’s leading SaaS conference, this event is known for hosting a wide diversity of speakers, from startups to Statesmen. From CAD$395.

 

June 2019

Unbounce Call To Action Conference 2019
June 25-26 (2019-06-25),?Vancouver, Canada
Annual conference organized by landing page masters Unbounce. A tsunami of insights on CRO, UX, PPC and SEO. Perfect for SaaS marketers at any level. Tickets from $600.

 

July 2019

MozCon
July 15-17 (2019-07-15),?Seattle, USA
Rand may have gone but the Moz machine powers on, and appears to be in very capable hands. Every SaaS marketer should be made to attend at least once. Tickets from $799.

SaaS Monster (Hong Kong)
July 8-11 (2019-07-08),?Hong Kong
Billed as the World’s leading SaaS conference, this event is known for hosting a wide diversity of speakers, from startups to Statesmen. Tickets from $340.

 

August 2019

Traction Conf
Aug 7-8 (2019-08-07),?Vancouver, Canada
Traction Conf brings founders and leaders from some of the fastest growing tech companies to Vancouver to show you how to scale your business. Tickets from $299.

 

September 2019

Hypergrowth East/West 2019
September, Boston and San Francisco, USA
Drift has yet to confirm September dates for its Hypergrowth conferences but if 2018 is anything to go by, expect them to be adjacent to Inbound and Dreamforce respectively. Ticket prices to be confirmed.

Inbound 2019
Sept 3-6 (2019-09-04),?Boston, USA
HubSpot’s annual conference of inbound marketing saw over 21,000 attendees in 2017. Someone needs to build a bigger Boston! Tickets from $299.

Business of Software Conference
Sept 16-18 (2019-09-16),?Boston, USA
The 12th Business of Software Conference USA. With attendance capped at 400 this event is where software company founders go to learn from each other. Tickets from $1,450.

 

October 2019

SaaStock
Oct 14-16 (2019-10-14),?Dublin, Ireland
The best opportunity in Europe to meet with your fellow SaaS founders, execs and investors. Worth going for the Guinness and great craic alone. Ticket prices to be confirmed.

 

November 2019

Web Summit
Nov 4-7 (2019-11-04),?Lisbon, Portugal
With over 1,200 speakers Web Summit claims to be the largest tech conference in the world. A place for movers and shakers to connect. Tickets from €850.

Dreamforce
Nov 19-22?(2019-11-19),?San Francisco, USA
Salesforce’s annual event with over 3,200 sessions covering every concievable industry, theme, role and Salesforce product has shifted from September to November for 2019. Ticket prices to be confirmed.

SaaS North
Nov 26-27 (2019-11-26),?Ottawa, Canada
The biggest SaaS conference in Canada, organized by B2B SaaS Accelerator, L-SPARK.?Ticket prices to be confirmed.

 

December 2019

Recur
December, Boston, USA
SaaS metrics software company Profitwell organize this one day conference focussed on data driven acquisition, monetization and retention for subscription businesses. Star speakers and optional day workshops before and after.?Ticket prices to be confirmed.

Growth Marketing Conference
Dec 10-11 (2019-12-10), San Francisco, USA
A packed 2-day conference covering organic, viral and paid acquisition and retention strategies and tactics for both B2B and B2C. With plans to expand globally in 2019, we’ll add details of events and locations as they become available. Tickets from $499.

 

 

Browse SaaS Conferences for 2019 in Calendar View

 

Which SaaS Conferences 2019 are you planning to attend?

It’s worth mentioning that all events are subject to change so please let us know if you spot anything that needs correcting. Also, we’d love to hear from you if you think we missed an event: either use the comments below or contact us.

 

Photo credit: Cody Glenn/Web Summit via Sportsfile

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Ep. 25: Transactional Email with Megan Tobin of Sendwithus http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-25-transactional-email-with-megan-tobin-of-sendwithus/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-25-transactional-email-with-megan-tobin-of-sendwithus/#respond Mon, 17 Dec 2018 16:16:23 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1013 Starting out after college as a concert technician, Megan Tobin is now a veteran tech marketer and VP of marketing at enterprise email creation platform, Dyspatch by Sendwithus. She shares her thoughts on developments in SaaS marketing and transactional email systems.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 25: Megan Tobin, Sendwithus

Starting out after college as a concert technician, Megan Tobin is now a veteran tech marketer and VP of marketing at enterprise email creation platform, Dyspatch by Sendwithus. She shares her thoughts on developments in SaaS marketing and transactional email systems.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 25 Transcript

To follow…

The post Ep. 25: Transactional Email with Megan Tobin of Sendwithus appeared first on 47 Insights.

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-25-transactional-email-with-megan-tobin-of-sendwithus/feed/ 0 Starting out after college as a concert technician, Megan Tobin is now a veteran tech marketer and VP of marketing at enterprise email creation platform, Dyspatch by Sendwithus. She shares her thoughts on developments in SaaS marketing and transactiona... Starting out after college as a concert technician, Megan Tobin is now a veteran tech marketer and VP of marketing at enterprise email creation platform, Dyspatch by Sendwithus. She shares her thoughts on developments in SaaS marketing and transactional email systems. 47 Insights yes 41:15
Ep. 24: Aggregating Marketing Data with Hailey Friedman of Improvado http://www.remixcave.com/blog/aggregating-marketing-data-hailey-friedman-improvado/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/aggregating-marketing-data-hailey-friedman-improvado/#respond Mon, 10 Dec 2018 13:00:42 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1004 From starting out as an English Teacher in the Bronx with no experience in marketing, Hailey Friedman progressed through a series of marketing roles before landing at Improvado helping to solve a common marketing problem: aggregating all marketing data from multiple channels into a single platform.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 24: Hailey Friedman, Improvado

From starting out as an English Teacher in the Bronx with no experience in marketing, Hailey Friedman progressed through a series of marketing roles before landing at Improvado?and helping to solve an all too common marketing problem: aggregating all marketing data from multiple channels into a single platform.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 24 Transcript

Paul: On today’s show, I have an interview with Haley Friedman, Head of Marketing at in Improvado. Hope you enjoy it.

Hayley Friedman from Improvado and Growth Marketing Pro, which I believe is your blog. And I don’t know if you pronounce it BAMF… but is it badass marketers and founders?

Hailey: That’s it.

Paul: So you’ve got a lot of things going on there? You haven’t always been a marketer Have you?

Hailey: I haven’t no.

Paul: So why don’t you tell us how you got started in marketing?

Hailey: For sure. Um, I did not come from a traditional marketing background, I didn’t wake up one day thinking I’m going to be a marketer when I grow up. I actually started out after college, I was a teacher, an eighth grade English teacher in the Bronx, in New York, for Teach for America. So I did that for two years. And while I was teaching, I had an idea for a mobile app startup, that I put together a team of people from across the country. And we built this mobile app together and launched on the App Store, which was really exciting for me at that time. And we won a student startup competition, and were invited down to South by Southwest. And so I pitched this startup idea in front of hundreds of people. And that was kind of the first time I ever saw this tech startup world in person. So all these kids are there with their logos on their t shirts, and they’re all excited. And I was like, wow, this energy is incredible. And this is fun. And I want to do this forever.

So I left teaching to venture into the tech startup world. And so ultimately, my startup idea didn’t pan out as I had planned, because my two engineers were recruited by Facebook and Microsoft, and they no longer cared about my little side project. But it was a great stepping stone for me. And I say, the biggest learning that I got from the experience was that you can have a really cool product, and you can have an incredible team. But if you don’t know how to get customers, you don’t have anything that’s worth very much. So that’s kind of what got me fascinated with, you know, this whole idea of what does it take to get someone to buy something or to sign up for something, this was this kind of like grey box that I didn’t understand, marketing. Um, and so I really wanted to learn about what it what it takes to get customers. And so I decided that I wanted to join a startup at the ground floor and kind of watch other successful founders grow company from the ground up and learn what it takes to really run a business. And so I joined a startup in New York and as their second employee, and I learned a tonne, and learned a tonne, but I still didn’t get that… I didn’t scratch the itch that I was really looking for, that consumer marketing itch.

Paul: Did you get paid as well?

Hailey: Yeah got a job, you know, I think when you can show initiative, you know, even though my startup didn’t become anything, if you can show that you’re going to take an idea and take initiative to build it. It’s really good for the resume for sure. So I think that that really was what got me from teaching, and allowed me to get my foot in the door in startup world because people were willing to trust that I was going to have that kind of like entrepreneurial, do whatever it takes attitude, because I tried something before.

Paul: So going back to the app, how long ago was it? And what was the app called? And what did it do? I’m curious.

Hailey: Yeah, it was called Thursday. And it was a tool, it was kind of like a social event planning tool. And so it was before Facebook had a very sophisticated event feature on it. And so I found that after college, I moved into Manhattan, and I… everyone I had grown up with back in New York also moved into Manhattan. And when it came to the weekend, we didn’t really know what to do where to go in such a big city. Even though I knew a lot of people there, it was, it was hard to know what to do. And so the idea was this app Thursday was that people would use it as their Social Planning calendar so that when it came to the weekend, you’d be able to check. You know, it’s Friday night, what are the top 10 venues that people I know are going to how many people are going where type of thing, there is still not really a great solution like that out there. But Facebook’s gotten a little more sophisticated with their events. They added the little interested button on event so that people can show interest without completely committing, I’ve learned that people are very non committal.

Paul: Oh yes, haha.

Hailey: They don’t like to, you know, put a fork in it in advance that they’re going go

Paul: Everything is a maybe. So what was the New York startup? Can you can you tell us more about that? what you were doing there?

Hailey: It was a mobile advertising startup. And so it was being founded by these guys who started a big digital ad agency in New York. And they were leaving to start this mobile ad agency, because at the time mobile ad, advertising was brand new and really hot. And how it was going to be done? Well, it was being done really poorly with fuzzy banner ads that were, they were taking it from desktop and putting on mobile and it wasn’t mobile first. And so they created this. It’s called, it was called zap 360. Actually, they are still a company that’s running. And it was a mobile banner ad, that would be scrolling text at the bottom of your screen, kind of like a stock market ticker or like a breaking news alert. So it’s just text. So it’s really, really easy to implement. You need a designer to create the ad.

Paul: Cool. And so you were doing marketing there. So you so chanced upon or learned about marketing, because of the Thursday app, which is something you bootstrapped yourself. You got a taste for it at south by southwest, entered the crazy world of marketing, work for New York startup helping those guys getting started. And then what happened?

Hailey: And then, so that that mobile advertising company became more of like a B2B tool. So we had a sales team, and I was doing kind of more account management. And so it wasn’t really learning what I wanted to learn, which was, you know, business to consumer marketing, how do you get Joe Schmo to sign up for something. And so I decided that I wanted to pick up and move to San Francisco. So I left all my family, friends, and even my boyfriend at the time, and I got on a plane and moved out San Francisco. And before I left, I had like 45 phone and Skype interviews from people that I connected with on angellist. So if you’re looking for a job in marketing in San Francisco angellist is a really great tool. And, turns out the very first phone interview that I had ended up being the first offer that I got, and also the one that I ended up taking.

So it was a company called RealtyShares, which was, which is a real estate crowdfunding platform. So that means you can invest in real estate online for as little as like $5,000. And so I was hired by their director of marketing, as I was the second marketing higher on the team, there was only 15 people at the time. And the guy who hired me was named Mark Spera. And he kind of took me under his wing and taught me a tonne about consumer marketing. And I was having a blast learning about it and became really fascinated and kind of took it upon myself to educate myself on it to go to events, talk to other marketers to read other bloggers like Neil Patel puts out a lot of really great content. And I just became really fascinated and excited about the marketing world. And Mark and I had so much fun talking about marketing, and we’ve said start a marketing blog together. So now, we are still working on it. And it’s really growing. And it’s been a blast to work on and learn more about SEO and blogs. And that’s been an adventure, but it’s called growthmarketingpro.com. And, yeah, so

Paul: Nice plug, haha, do you want to say it again? But yeah it’s good good. It’s a great blog, I read it.

Hailey: Thank you. Yeah, it’s really fun. We try and put out good stuff. Just really sharing our learnings based on like, what’s worked for us? Yeah, so anyway, I was at RealtyShares for two and a half years and it grew from 15 people to 120 people. And yeah…

Paul: Wow, you must have been doing something right.

Hailey: Exactly. So I was in charge of investor acquisition. So a consumer facing role and I managed every channel at one point or another until we hired and grew the team out. But it was a fun role, because I got to test out every channel. And then once we master that, we hired some managers and I try the next one. So it was cool to get get my hands on all the different channels and platforms and what allowed me to create so much content for Growth Marketing Pro, because it’s kind of like, got my hands on so many different pieces of the marketing.

Paul: Yeah, you learnt alot in a short space of time.

Hailey: Yeah, and so then a couple months ago, I decided to leave RealtyShares and look for a new opportunity. And what I realised is, I wanted to work for a tool that I love. And I realised that I really love marketing. You know, I had my blog. And I also run this community here in San Francisco of marketers, and founders, where I’m hosting events all the time, like fireside chats where I interview founders and tell their growth story and so it would be awesome if I could leverage You know, this community and my blog, or my daytime job, it would be cool about doing marketing to marketers, my life would be.

So um, so a friend told me about this company called and Improvado that was looking for a head of marketing, and I went over to meet them. And when I learned about their tool I was like, blown away, because this was exactly… it was a tool that was solving like the biggest problem that I had ever faced as a marketer. And that was aggregating my marketing data. So when I joined RealtyShares, Mark put me in charge of, you know, all of our reporting, all of our budgeting, all of our forecasting and made me responsible for presenting out our marketing performance every week, in the meeting to our CEO. And here I was, I was an English teacher before this.

Paul: Haha, how good is your Excel pivot table skills?

Hailey: I had to Google everything about Excel, it was really hard for me, I’m not a math person, like it does not come naturally to me, numbers at all. So it was really brutal. And he knew that, like, he knew it’s hard for me, and that I was slower at it than other people. But I appreciate that he pushed me because you really, it’s very difficult to be a great marketer, if you don’t have a handle on the analytic side and the numbers, you’re going to be spending a company’s money, you better be able to justify that it’s being spent efficiently, and that you’re making more money for the company rather than wasting money.

So I’m grateful for the push to learn it. Now I’ve got it under my belt, but even after I figured out what to do and how to use Excel, it still took me probably like 10 to 20 hours every week, just to aggregate all the data for these weekly reports, right. So like, I had to log into… my data is all over the place. It’s in Google Analytics, website visitor data, to see what I spent on Facebook, or how my Facebook campaigns are doing I have to log into Facebook as well as logging into AdWords and log into LinkedIn and log into all the different places where we’re spending money and have to export the data from there, then I have to import it into some Google spreadsheet or Excel Doc, where I’m creating some kind of dashboard and organise the data, it’s like, a freaking nightmare.

And I had to do it every single week, it took me two days of every week to do that. It took me two days just to prepare the data for these meetings. And I realised that I’m probably not the only marketing person who’s dealing with this. And ultimately, Mark and I decided that this wasn’t the best way for me to be spending my time. So we hired a data analyst to manage it. But still, he was doing it, you know, like someone in every company.

Paul: It’s madness.

Hailey: It’s actually madness. So flash forward to me interviewing at Improvado and learning what a Improvado was. And essentially, it is a tool that automates the entire marketing data aggregation process. So essentially, it’s a tool that was built by marketers, so actually, the company was originally a marketing agency. And they were helping all their clients. And they built this tool for their clients that would collect all their marketing data into one dashboard. And the client said, like, started telling them, you know, we would pay for this tool on its own.

Paul: Forget the agency services.

Hailey: Yeah, and so actually, they pivoted, and they became Improvado. And so now, full time, this marketing team that used to be marketing agency is working on this product, that is a tool that lets marketers collect all their data in minutes in one place. So it’ll sink into Facebook, and LinkedIn, Snapchat, and Instagram, all the different places, you’re sending money, and MailChimp and you know, like your CRM and things like that. And, it’ll slurp all the data into this one place so that you can see how much you spent across every single channel in one place. And you can see, you can click in and get really granular because as marketers you know, we want to see it by campaign, we want to see it by ad group, we want to see it by keyword, and by ad. So you can do all that without leaving this one dashboard. So it’s all in one place. So you never ever have to do that work ever again, anytime you want to see your data there in real time. So I was like, oh my God, this is exactly what I’ve been looking for. And so I was really excited to be able to join a company that was solving, like the biggest pain point I’d ever felt, or I’d ever seen anyone facing as a marketer. Um, and yeah, so I became their head of marketing, like four or five months ago.

Paul: Wow. So you’re only few months into this role, how’s it shaping out, how’s you’re reporting?

Hailey: Okay, so I’m the first and only marketer at this company that’s focusing on marketing. And so I had to come in here and organise the data, you know, even though that’s what this company does, they didn’t have a marketer before. So we didn’t have the marketing data organised, right. So I came in and organised marketing data in the way that I know how, which is to create a manual dashboard on Google Sheets, you know, with various tabs, like a daily view, a monthly view, yearly view, you know, mid month pacing view, all these different tabs, and I put the data together, and it took me like a whole weekend to get it organised. And then I came in on my first day and showed it to the Cofounders. This is what I’m… you know, I’ve spent all weekend working on this. And she’s like, in five minutes and a couple of clicks, she showed me… she basically automated in five minutes, what I had spent all weekend.

Paul: Haha, so that was a lesson learned.

Hailey: I was both angry and relieved. Ever though I had wasted all that time. Not only that, but literally hundreds and thousands of hours of my marketing career. Aggregating data in that way. But I was also obviously relieved that I would never ever have to do it again.

Paul: Great, and now you want to pass these benefits on to all the other marketers and help save our lives as well.

Hailey: Hundred percent. Yes. And, I mean, I don’t know that everyone knows there’s a solution to this problem. So I just want to let everyone know that they’re…

Paul: Everyone knows about the problem definitely. So tell me this. I mean, so you started out as teacher, created an app, brilliant. And then you went into a start up? And now you’re in your third or fourth company and you’ve got the Growth Marketing Pro blog. And you’ve got badass marketers and founders. And you’re the head of marketing for in Improvado? How the hell do you juggle it all? Do you ever sleep?

Hailey: For a while I was not sleeping. I will tell you that. Ummm now I do. Now I sleep.

Paul: It’s all because reporting, haha.

Hailey: Automating data really helped, I’ll tell you that. Um, but yeah, It is hard to manage. But um, a couple of things I did. I’m pretty interested in the efficiency time management space. So I deleted recently all my social media apps off my phone.

Paul: That’s a crime surely, no wonder Facebook shares are down.

Hailey: I know. I thought that right after I deleted Facebook, so maybe I just downloaded it back again.

Yeah, I first downloaded an app called in moments. And it tracks how many hours and minutes you spend on your social media apps.

Paul: That sounds horrible.

Hailey: For an hour a day Like…

Paul: That’s probably not much compared to a lot of people.

Hailey: Yeah, I’m sure it’s worse than that. But if you think about it, even that, right, that’s like seven hours a week that I’m spending just doing nonsense. So um, yeah, I deleted them all. And for it’s my third week, so you know…

Paul: Oh, wow. On your social diet?

Hailey: It might be a little simpler.

Paul: Yeah. Does your head feel a less confused place, do you feel you can focus and concentrate better?

Hailey: Definitely. Yeah, I’m a pretty easily distracted person. So it helps to kind of like…

Paul: I think most marketers are, by their very nature. So that’s a great productivity hack, remove all social media from your phone. What else have you really learned in terms of, you know, marketing insights, because you know, you’ve had a hell of a career progression in a relatively short space of time. You must be somebody who learns very quickly. Have you got any particular trick you can share with us? Or is it just hard work and not sleeping?

Hailey: Yeah. No, I definitely believe in working smart, not hard. And so when it comes to marketing, obviously, there’s so many different things you can do. There’s so many different channels and tactics. And I think for a lot of people, the hardest thing is figuring out where to start. And what’s gonna be the lowest hanging fruit. So I think… so Mark and I work together on our blog, and we’re always talking about, we actually offer a service, we will help businesses by building them a custom growth playbook. We surveyed our readers, and that’s what they asked for, they asked for like, customised health. And so there’s a lot of people that don’t know where to start, they don’t know what’s going to be the most impactful. So you have to think about, and this is what Mark and I do and we help these companies think about what’s going to be the most impactful, thinking about impact, thinking about ease of implementation and speed of implementation. The intent of like… user intent? How can you build a better look, start by getting people that are the further down the funnel? So like people that are already searching for keywords that are really relevant to what you’re doing, or referral marketing, taking your customers and turning them into advocates or taking influencers and building an affiliate programme and turning those influencers into advocates for your company? Um, but yeah, I think just thinking about impact ease, speed of implementation, intent and just prioritise.

Paul: That’s good advice. So that’s fantastic. I mean, hats off to you. I don’t know how you’ve juggle so many things. But your new job Improvado, the blog, and Bamf if we can call it that. It’s been a real pleasure to speak to you Hailey and find out so much about what you’re doing. And good luck with it all. Sounds like you’re doing great.

Hailey: Thanks so much for having me. And I wanted to just share one one little gift for your listeners. If you guys want to see what my marketing dashboard, my Google manual, my Google Sheet manuel marketing dashboard, I actually saved a blank version just for you guys. So if you go to improvado.io/podcast, you can head over there and download your own spreadsheet, blank template version. So you can see if your marketing, looking at your marketing data, maybe it’ll give you ideas of ways that you want to slice and dice your data.

Paul: That’s great. Thank you very much. Appreciate it. Thanks a lot for your time Hailey.

Hailey: Thank you. Thanks for having me.

Paul: I hope you enjoyed my conversation with Hailey. For more info on in Improvado, please visit Improvado.io. For more info about this show. And to get our links to iTunes, Google Play SoundCloud, Stitcher and YouTube, check out www.remixcave.com. And if you have any SaaS marketing insights that you’d like to share on the show, please get in touch. Until next time.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The post Ep. 24: Aggregating Marketing Data with Hailey Friedman of Improvado appeared first on 47 Insights.

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/aggregating-marketing-data-hailey-friedman-improvado/feed/ 0 From starting out as an English Teacher in the Bronx with no experience in marketing, Hailey Friedman progressed through a series of marketing roles before landing at Improvado helping to solve a common marketing problem: aggregating all marketing data... From starting out as an English Teacher in the Bronx with no experience in marketing, Hailey Friedman progressed through a series of marketing roles before landing at Improvado helping to solve a common marketing problem: aggregating all marketing data from multiple channels into a single platform. 47 Insights yes 24:56
Ep. 23: SaaS SEO with Jeremiah Smith of SimpleTiger http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-23-saas-seo-jeremiah-smith-simpletiger/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-23-saas-seo-jeremiah-smith-simpletiger/#respond Mon, 03 Dec 2018 13:00:43 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=1000 Virtual agency owner Jeremiah Smith of SimpleTiger outlines how he shifted his business' focus from 'SEO for everybody' to specializing in SEO for SaaS.

The post Ep. 23: SaaS SEO with Jeremiah Smith of SimpleTiger appeared first on 47 Insights.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 23: Jeremiah Smith, SimpleTiger

Virtual agency owner Jeremiah Smith of SimpleTiger outlines how he shifted his business’ focus from ‘SEO for everybody’ to specializing in SEO for SaaS.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 23 Transcript

Paul: On today’s show, I have an interview with Jeremian Smith, Co founder and CEO at Simpletiger. Hope you enjoy it.

So, Jeremiah Smith, from Simpletiger, an SEO agency specialising in helping SaaS companies, is that right?

Jeremiah: That’s correct. Yep. We mainly work with SaaS companies, we work with companies of all types, but we mainly focus on SaaS companies.

Paul: So tell me about the Simpletiger journey how you got started and how you chose to specialise in SaaS?

Jeremiah: Sure, absolutely. So, first of all, I’ve been in marketing for a little over 12 years now, I used to build websites. And that was actually how I stepped into marketing. I just loved playing around the computer designing things, I was more of just kind of being a nerd and playing with it. I didn’t have any real intention of actually doing it as a business until a couple of friends of mine liked my websites and stuff. Of course, my mom liked my website. And then one of her clients who is an accountant. One of her clients was like, we love your website, we want you to build us one. So I built them a website. And then after I got it built for them, I was like there we go, awesome. I was so happy and everything then they were like we want it to show up in Google. How do you do that? And I was like, that’s interesting question. I probably just have to go like fill out a form and submit it. I had no idea. I had no clue. And so I started looking into it naturally. I started searching Google, how to get your website to show up in Google and discovered this whole underground industry I knew nothing about the time called SEO.

I was blown away. I was like, wait, this is like way more intense than you might think. And, you know, it’s not like if you build it, they will come kind of thing. You actually have to really put some work into your website after it’s been built to make it do something for you. So I started studying search engine optimization through a couple of resources at the time, favourite resource was actually a little company out in in Seattle called SEO Moz. And that’s before they changed their names to Moz. And it was just a blog at the time, Rand Fishkin was writing these incredible articles about how to do SEO, and he was just writing them for free and I was floored. I was like, This is incredible. I devoured everything. And so I’m learning all this stuff and practising on my clients website. I told them at the outset, I don’t know how to do this. But I learn very quickly and I badly want to do it. So are you opening that and they were like, Yeah, but it better show results.

I was like, you got it, I’m going to do my best. And so I put a lot of work into it. And lo and behold, a couple months in, they started seeing some results, about six to 12 months in their business was changed because of the results that we were able to generate with SEO. And this is while I was teaching myself, this is not speaking to me so much about my capability, as I think it is speaking to SEO and its value, at least in those early days, and how simple it was to just really get a lot out of Google back then. So that that really kind of lit my fire for this new industry. I was done building websites at the time, I was like, I’m ready to just market them. I just want to get them to show up in Google and do a good job. So I changed my resume around a bit and said I’m going to go get a job at an ad agency. And I’m going to try to do this. So ended up landing a job at a huge agency in Atlanta that had massive clients all fortune 500 companies and, really learned that the big guys play the game. The exact same way as the small guys do, it’s just a lot more budget, a lot more effort is put into all of that. And that’s that’s pretty much it. That’s how that works.

So yeah, after that I was totally sold on, on the fact that anyone from a small company, the small mom and pop shop I started with to NBC or Etrade can do SEO, and it can be beneficial to all of them. So I knew that my skill set was something I really valued and loved and decided I would try to run off as a consultant and build an agency around it. So I’ll kind of pause there.

Paul: Haha yeah, that was all in one breath.

So when did you actually start Simpletiger? So you had this thing, and then I guess it developed. But has it been a few years now?

Jeremiah: So I always had this. I’ve always had this tendency to think of my dreams probably a little too seriously. And that’s part of the problem of being an ambitious entrepreneur is you take you take your ideas very seriously, and you want to sell them to everyone. So before I even got that job in an ad agency, I had the name Simpletiger figured out.

I bought the domain name, I built the website. It was a awful rinky dink little website. And I was just, I was so proud of my brand that would one day evolve. But this is what I was going to do. I was going to build a business called Simpletiger and didn’t know much about why or anything like that at the time. But over time, the brand really evolved into exactly what I wanted it to be. And I’m so happy with it now. So that was that was about 12 years ago. . Yeah, quite a while, right after I built that website, and I decided to do SEO, once I decided that I loved SEO. That was when Simple tiger started and yeah…

Paul: So where does SaaS come into the frame? How recent was that?

Jeremiah: Right, great question. Now that’s very recent, I’ll say that. That’s like within the past year and a half to two years. We’ve narrowed our focus to just SaaS. And I’ll explain a little bit about that. So Simpletiger was originally just myself, and I was working for anyone that wanted search engine optimization, I didn’t care who they were.

Paul: Hired gun.

Jeremiah: Yeah, I didn’t care if it was a small local attorney here in town or a massive fortune 500 Corporation, I would love to work with them, you know, and over time, I got my brother involved, who just had a wonderful knack for the web. He kind of grew up on the internet more so than I did. He’s a little younger than myself. But he was very sharp, very shrewd business person as well. So he he brought to the table something that I don’t think I have as much of and so I really appreciated that and he and I just formed a great team. And so we would consult clients under the name Simpletiger.

He kind of had his, I kind of had mine and then over time we decided, you know what we need some help. We do some awesome consulting, but we need to actually produce some stuff in house for our clients. And so we started hiring on contractors to help us with that. And after we got our first couple of contractors, we went through some rough patches. But then we finally got a couple of contractors that were just really, really good. And we decided, you know what, we should probably push the lever and turn this into an agency and hire them on this full time employees. And let’s really just go as official as possible with it. And so we went ahead and did that. And we turned it into an agency hired them on and that was really I think, when Simpletiger, the agency it is today was kind of formed. But in those days, we were still taking on anybody and working with any kind of company.

It wasn’t until a while later that I kind of noticed through the 80/20 principle, which is what we always apply to our clients. We were looking at ourselves and I was thinking, what are the you know, 20% of clientele that yield 80% of the income. What are the 20% of the clientele that make us the most happy, what are the, you know, the easiest projects for us to work on to get the most results, things like that. And I kept seeing this pattern of SaaS companies. They were the ones that for some reason we had an interesting marriage with every single SaaS project we worked on, we seem to fall in love with the client, ecommerce companies would come and go, nothing wrong with them at all. So understand that this is more of like a just a personality thing than anything else and a match.

You know, all kinds of other companies would come and go but SaaS just kind of stayed in the background as like this trustworthy type of clientele that just understood us and we got along with them and we got each other we just clicked and so after reading on enough different blog articles, that enough other agency owners, you know, their number one regret or mistake is they wish they had chosen the niche sooner. And I heard them say that over and over and over again. And finally it started hitting me and I’m like am I going to kick myself for not choosing a niche?

I remember getting in a couple more heated discussions with clients that I didn’t want to work with, about results that they didn’t understand were there and just, you know, just problems and frustration, and realise, you know what? My SaaS clients don’t do this to me.

So discussed that with Sean. We decided, you know what, let’s look strongly at choosing this niche and seeing what that would do. And so we actually went and talked to some of our, our existing SaaS clients at the time and said, What if we were an SEO agency that only serve the SaaS community? And a lot of them said, Well, we would have chosen you a lot sooner or paid a lot more, you know, things like that. And I was like, Oh, perfect. So it validated things for us. And it was at that point a couple years ago, I think we decided actually, probably about a year and a half ago, we decided look, let’s do this transition plan. Let’s start saying that we go after SaaS companies directly.

Paul: Haha.

Jeremiah: Let’s do it in our marketing. Let’s still take on anyone who comes to us. But let’s specifically go after SaaS companies aggressively. And so we started doing that we started getting a lot of SaaS business, we changed our marketing and our messaging, we changed our conversations. We changed where we’re publishing content and who we’re talking to. We started getting a lot more SaaS business, and the relationships have just been stellar. It’s been so much easier since we made that change.

Paul: Yeah, I mean, nicheing down is just, it’s just so much easier to sell because, you know who you’re selling to and you can have conversations about churn rates and MRI or, you know, all of the things that are particular to an industry rather than just being very generic. So tell me… here’s the interesting thing, because, like yourself, I have been involved in SEO for a long time. And actually, I just took it off my website, because I found it really hard doing SEO for SaaS businesses, because I find that they’re impatient about the results that they want from SEO. And so, pretty much, same as you said, my 80/20 was 80% of what I was doing paid campaigns for them. And 20% was SEO.

The thing that was causing me the most grief was the 20% the SEO. So how do you deal with the impatience that SaaS businesses naturally have because they’re all about growth?

SEO, it just takes time. Right?

Jeremiah: Right. So what we’ve actually had to do is take a bit of a maverick approach to it, which has not been comfortable. We we kind of go against the grain with this suggestion, but a lot of companies come to us and say, we want SEO and I asked what is your goal and they say, we want to increase conversions by 10%.

Okay, awesome goal. Now, I start to pitch them paid search. And they say, Wait, wait, we want SEO? And I’m like, now which is higher on your list of parties, buying SEO? Would you rather check that box or would you rather increase conversions by 10%? check that box? Which, which one of those matters more? Do you want to have just bought SEO this year? Or do you want to have increased your conversions by 10% this year, and I don’t want to be too much of a smart alec when I when I go there, but I have to like change the logic and the way they’re thinking because the issue commonly is, at least in so far, as marketing people are concerned, the flashy thing is what we all want, or the thing everyone’s hyping about is the thing we want social proof works on marketers, just like it does, non marketers.

So we have to keep in mind that when people start buzzing about SEO, doesn’t mean we need to run out and buy SEO, and it’s going to solve all our… miraculously solve all the problem. Sean and I kind of discussed this recently, people don’t come to us wanting to buy SEO, they come to us wanting to buy what SEO delivers. And so long as we stay focused on that, then it allows us to actually be a lot more intuitive, and more of a hunter in regards to bringing home results for our clients, where I say, look, here’s the deal, we we can bring you home results with SEO. And if you’ve got, you know, if you just built your website, and you launched last month, that kind of thing, and you’ve got a good six to 12 months until you need to show results, we can bring you home results with SEO, well, we’re going to go with an agency that’s going to get us results faster, like well, we can get you results faster, it’s just going to cost probably 100 grand this month instead of 100 grand in the course of the year, right? Because we got to write a lot of content, we got to build a lot of links, we got a lot of work to do. And we got a short period of time to do it. So if we have a lot of work to do in a short period of time to do it, it’s going to cost a lot of money, we have a long time to do it, it’s going to cost the same amount of money just spread out over time.

But if the window of results is the key factor, then what I’ll recommend is, if we have to get results in month one or two, then let’s start a paid search campaign. And that’s not what you want the long run. That’s not what I want to give you a long run, I want to have years of relationship together. But I want to start it with a couple of dates. And I want to start it by validating that we are right for each other and things like that. And paid search is one of those simple, easy things, we set up an AdWords account for you, we get it running target a few keywords, if you hate us, you just revoke our access and you’re off on your own, everything is fine, right. But if we start with an AdWords account, we can quickly test some assumptions. We can test the assumption that you know your target keywords, we can test the assumption that you know your audience, we could test the assumption that your site converts well. And we can quickly validate what out of all of that is true. Because maybe you have 100 keywords you want to go after and six of them convert well.

Well we figured that in month one or two, wouldn’t you rather know that month one or two with a $5,000 investment versus month eight with a $35,000 investment. So let’s do that. And I know that doesn’t make you happy at night. But at least you’ll know what keywords we need to target. And now instead of these 100 keywords that we’re going to spread all our SEO effort out across, we can focus on six keywords and we can spread our effort on those and be very narrow and focused. And then within those keywords, obviously people bring up the the long tail keyword argument I totally agree. But long tail keywords are almost always derivatives of some mothership term or category that you’re talking about. So once we start blogging about a single generic target keyword, you can’t help but to organically rank for long tail variations of it. Because how else are you going to write about it?

So really, I guess that’s my super long answer to your simple question. The short answer would be paid search. I think if the client doesn’t know their target keywords, doesn’t know their landing pages, they’re converting content and things like that, well, let’s start with paid search. If they do know all of that, it’s a little bit more of an aggressive project that usually looks like just a big proposal, a big number on the proposal, you need a lot of link building or a lot of content, something like that.

Paul: That exactly mirrors my experience as well, using paid as a diagnostic to work out which keywords are then going to work so that when you do invest time and money in SEO, you’ve validated exactly, you know what it is that you’re going after. And it’s amazing how many you know, SaaS businesses just don’t do that they do abit of keyword search, and then they go right, we’re going to create a tonne of content around this. And we’re just like, has anybody actually validated this?

Jeremiah: Yeah. Like I do a lot of target shooting. And I think it’s really, really fun. I love the art of it. But I would be terrified if I were sitting in the lane with a gun and you turn off the lights, and I had to continue hitting the target. And that’s what you’re doing when you don’t validate your keywords, yet, you have no clue what’s going to happen. You might turn on the lights a year from now and be like, Oh my gosh, we got a bull’s eye one time out of the 20 shots. You know what I mean? But that’s pretty much what it feels like.

Now, that’s kind of a dramatic example and our keyword research is really solid when we do our keyword research. But if I don’t feel confident about your target keywords and things like that, enough for us to go ahead and perform just keyword research, then I’m going to push really hard for paid search. And if people push back on the paid search thing, I’m like, look, I’m just not comfortable going down that road, I don’t want to, I don’t want to let you down and have my reputation out there on the line, you know, and that actually speaks really well to clients for an agency to turn away the business because of their reputation. And it kind of makes you take a step back and think, am I really going about this the right way. And I love it because SaaS companies appreciate that authenticity. They’re not used to dealing with that, they’re actually more used to dealing with hardcore sales guys trying to pitch him something that’s last year, and SaaS is next year. And so they don’t even want to hear that, you know, so I don’t come out of the gate swinging with with with salesy tactics and stuff like that.

Paul: Yeah, you’re in it for the long term, which is the only way to fly as far as I’m concerned.

Jeremiah: Same here.

Paul: So it’s really interesting. I think I was reading on your website, are you based remote from your team?

Jeremiah: Yeah.

Paul: So how… I’m just curious about how that works. Because, you know, a lot of SaaS businesses are virtual themselves. But I think with agencies is quite hard. And, you know, the agency that I used to own you know, we weren’t, we were all in the same office and it makes it so much easier to control things, but I guess technology and whatnot has moved on. But as the owner, being separate from your team, how do you cope?

Jeremiah: It is… it can be tough at times. I will say I’ve worked at a couple of agencies in my life, and working in person is definitely easier. You’ve got that, in terms of collaboration, you’ve got all of the communication channels locked down, the face to face does so much more for people than I think a lot of society today really understands. But what I’ve learned is that a lot of the work that we do… 80% of the work that we do, does not need to happen face to face. We… when I say we I mean Simpletiger specifically, I don’t mean every company. And so because of that, I would really like to, I’d really like to remove a lot of what I would consider to almost be a distraction, so that my team can focus better on those pieces that do not require that Face Face necessarily.

Paul: So you’re a distraction, haha.

Jeremiah: So a lot of me being in the office during the week is distracting. And I know it is because I’m a loud, excitable person, and I love talking to people and everything, I will ruin a very productive team by walking in the room. So I have to be careful with that. Remote forces me to not be able to do that. And actually, we can set aside time for me to talk to my team. And that’s what we do. And that time sometimes is unproductive and it’s my fault. And and it’s actually kind of fun, which ends up being good in another way. So it adds a little bit of culture, which is probably one of the harder things in the remote work environment is establishing and developing a culture, it seems kind of it seems kind of random how the culture is going to happen. Whereas in person, there’s a vibe, there’s a neighbourhood in town that you’re in, that makes you act a certain way or feel a certain way, places that you go to eat around where you work, kind of, you know, that changes things in the dynamic a bit. But my employees are spread out throughout the country. And sometimes throughout the world.

Like for example, we have a couple of employees who are just randomly in Australia, or South Korea or something like that. You know, I’m personally going to be in Mexico in a few weeks. And it’s so we’re all floating all over the world. And because of that, we never really know what’s going on with the other person in their day to day life. But at the same time, when I really sat down and thought about it a while back, that’s not necessary for a successful company. And I would rather…

Paul: Not anymore.

Jeremiah: Yeah, not anymore. Not this type of company. And I would really like to offer that freedom to my team and have them really enjoy closing their laptop and looking around and be like, Oh my gosh, I love where I am. And they love it so much that they’re comfortable opening back up their laptop and working working again. You know, it’s wonderful when that’s the case. You don’t feel chained to a desk. So there are so many benefits and so many challenges to doing remote. And I actually did a really interesting podcast interview with a company called yonder.io, the yonder podcast, and they talk all about remote. That’s their whole thing. So if you want to learn more about remote, I definitely recommend checking out some of their episodes about how companies handle that.

Paul: This show has been sponsored by Yonder, haha.

Jeremiah: Haha, sorry about that, shameless plug.

Paul: You plug away. we should just say Simpletiger at least one more time, simpletiger.com

Jeremiah: Haha that feels cheesy.

Paul: It’s good. So since you made the change and focused on on SaaS, you’ve experienced growth, you’ve selected your niche. Have you spotted any kind of me-to agencies or you know… as a result of what you’ve done? Spotted anyone els or seen other people? Do you see it as a trend that there is going to be more and more agencies?

Jeremiah: I do. And I can’t tell in a lot of the cases if it was us first or them first. But at the same time, I think it is a… I think it is a growing trend. I think the specialty market is important, because you do have an expertise that some people desire. Whereas on the other end, some people are comfortable with the general approach. And so I think there’s some SaaS companies that we will simply never work with because they don’t care about the fact that we focus on SaaS, they don’t think of themselves as a SaaS company, even though they may be they think of themselves as something else.

And that’s that’s fine. I’m not worried about that. I think some of the challenges, actually speaking totally honestly, about being a SaaS focused agency is you’re going to inevitably run into competitors of each other, you have to sort out the conflict of interest situation, which is frustrating, because you don’t want to ever be caught in one. But at the same time, you don’t ever want to turn away business. And so you’ve got to find, you got to find a way to maintain your integrity and do it honestly, genuinely. But at the same time, just be very clear about where there actually is a conflict of interest.

Paul: So has that happened?

Jeremiah: So we’ve… we haven’t actually run into a conflict of interest where we had to turn someone away or anything like that. But we have run into some situations where we had to make sure that we sorted out the details before project occurred. And one company ended up not going with us because we were fully transparent with them that we’re working with a competitor. And and it’s your decision, we knew that we could, we could work with both simultaneously. Because we had done a prerequisite element in order to work with us, which was a bit of a strategy session and some some questionnaire and survey material, which gave us some deeper understanding into who their target clientele were, who their top competitors were until they called each other top competitors. And I agree they were, there was not as much of a client overlap or customer overlap on their part. And so I kind of felt honest in saying that, I don’t think there’s a conflict of interest here. We’re going after two different audiences. But at the same time, I completely respect your decision. So if you don’t want to work with us, I can’t I can’t change that. So that’s fine. So that’s, that’s really kind of where it goes usually.

Paul: That’s great. And I think that the transparency is everything. So one of the things I was just thinking about is the kind of tools that you use. So we we talked about Moz and I’ve used it just a couple of times in the last few weeks, I think that new keyword explorer tool is awesome.

Jeremiah: Yeah.

Paul: What other tools? Marketing stack, SaaS products do you guys use?

Jeremiah: Alright, so I highly recommend… I got a list of tools. I’m specifically thinking about your audience here. And when I think they should be on top of if they’re wanting to crush it with SEO, I highly recommend Ahrefs, Ahrefs.com. And it’s a fantastic tool set, it kind of blows me away, when it first came out, I was shocked. I was like, there’s no way their data is good. Because there’s so much of it and they give it to you quickly and like not for free. But it just seems like an unlimited way. I was just kind of blown away with it. But on using it for well over a couple of years now, we are floored by how how good the platform is. And and for the price. I think it’s awesome. So a Ahrefs would be my first recommendation, we use that for everything from content recommendations and content strategy to link development, outreach and doing competitive analysis. I think it’s fantastic for all of that, I wouldn’t personally use it for technical analysis of your website.

So if you are concerned about the technical structure of your site, I probably use either a tool called Deep crawl, or Screaming Frog, Screaming Frog is the very cheap version. Deep crawl is a very expensive version, deep crawl will do it all for you. So you understand everything and you could walk through it very simply, you can create your issue tracker list of things that you need to take care of on your website with within the crawl and make it really easy. Screaming Frog is going to be definitely a DIY tool, you’re going to have to understand what the terminology means. But it’s a very good crawler. So it’ll give you a full index of your site. So from a technical perspective, those two I think, are really good.

Then in regards to tracking results, which I think is very critical and important. Google Analytics needs to be set up properly, I can’t tell you how many clients we’ve worked with. They’re brilliant, sophisticated companies. And then we look at their analytics, and it is just not configured properly. And what I mean by that mainly is, set up some conversion metric tracking, you can use tools like mixpanel, and kiss metrics and stuff like that to get a better insight into your conversions. But I think if you’re not tracking some sort of conversion, at some point in your marketing funnel, you’re going to be flying blind with all of your marketing efforts. And that’s not cool. You’ve got to find out what works and what doesn’t. And without some good idea into into conversion tracking, you’re not going to know. And I would actually finally add to that, get it while you still can. Because I don’t know when they’re going to pull away more data from us, right? Like from an SEO guy here. I used to be able to tell you exactly what keywords drove what conversions on your site, I now have no clue, right, I have to be very careful about suggesting that this keyword gave a conversion from an organic listing because Google is not providing, they’ve encrypted that data. So yeah, I would say get conversion metric data set up in Google Analytics as much as you can.

Paul: Yeah. So it might be the top of the funnel, you may be just tracking something like a newsletter subscription, or maybe a white paper download or case study download or something through to trial or demo request depending on the type of business. GM got it like say, if you’re not measuring, you know what, what conversions what goals you’re reaching, there’s no point in spending money on marketing.

Jeremiah: Exactly. It reminds me of that… It reminds me of that Alison Wonderland moment where she’s going down this road, and it forks and the Cheshire Cat shows up and she says Which way do I go? And he’s like, well, it all depends on where you want to end up. And she’s like, well, I don’t know where I want to end up and he says, well, it doesn’t matter which way you go. Same is true here if you don’t know what you spend your marketing dollars on you’re never gonna know what works.

Paul: Exactly. And I think that’s a really really good place to leave it a Jeremiah, thank you very much. It’s been great chatting with you and learning a lot about your background and also the Simpletiger story and good luck with everything, I look forward to following your progress.

Jeremiah: Awesome. Thanks so much, Paul. I really appreciate being on the show today. It’s an honour. I hope you have a great day.

Paul: You too.

I hope you enjoyed my conversation with Jeremiah. For more info on Simpletiger, please visit www.simpletiger.com for more info about this show. And to get our links to iTunes, Google Play SoundCloud, Stitcher and YouTube, check out www.remixcave.com. And if you have any SaaS marketing insights that you’d like to share on the show, please get in touch. Until next time.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The post Ep. 23: SaaS SEO with Jeremiah Smith of SimpleTiger appeared first on 47 Insights.

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-23-saas-seo-jeremiah-smith-simpletiger/feed/ 0 Virtual agency owner Jeremiah Smith of SimpleTiger outlines how he shifted his business' focus from 'SEO for everybody' to specializing in SEO for SaaS. Virtual agency owner Jeremiah Smith of SimpleTiger outlines how he shifted his business' focus from 'SEO for everybody' to specializing in SEO for SaaS. 47 Insights yes 31:20
Ep. 22: Building A Customer Insights Engine with Annabel Youens http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-22-customer-insights-engine-annabel-youens/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-22-customer-insights-engine-annabel-youens/#respond Mon, 26 Nov 2018 13:00:03 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=996 It's unlikely you have ever heard of Appreciation Engine yet 64% of the music industry use the customer insights engine to understand customers and music fans. Co-Founder and CMO Annabel Youens explains how the SaaS platform works and their plans for the gaming industry and beyond.

The post Ep. 22: Building A Customer Insights Engine with Annabel Youens appeared first on 47 Insights.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 22: Annabel Youens, Appreciation Engine

It’s unlikely you have ever heard of Appreciation Engine yet 64% of the music industry use the customer insights engine to understand customers and music fans. Co-Founder and CMO Annabel Youens explains how the SaaS platform works and their plans for the gaming industry and beyond.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 22 Transcript

Paul: On today’s show, I have an interview with Annabel Youens, Co founder and CMO at Appreciation Engine. Hope you enjoy it.

I’m with Annabel Youens, Co founder and CMO at Appreciation Engine.

Annabel: It’s a mouthful, isn’t it? We like to say AE.

Paul: Very good, and you’re saying that you are rebranding AE?

Annabel: Yeah.

Paul: Okay. So Annabelle, tell us what Appreciation Engine is.

Annabel: It’s a customer insights platform. So when we started building AE, we were noticing out there, there was a lot of fans and customers that are doing all this word of mouth marketing online. And it was very hard to capture that as a business. You know, is this Twitter person, the same person as this person on Facebook? How do you piece that all together? And how do you recognise those key fans or customers that you should be focusing your energy on. So we created an engine that allows you to get your customers to basically opt in and register. And then our engine behind the scenes goes through their profiles and picks up key information that you care about as a business, so that you can have a snapshot of your customer, that actually changes in real time.

So I like to think of it as you know, in the old days, you get an email address, and you’d stick them on a newsletter list and be like they are forever on this newsletter list until they unsubscribe. You know, we have the technology now to go ‘oh this person is actually a living breathing person whose preferences change’. And so that’s what the engine does, it can track that so that you can go Oh, actually, this person needs to be segmented into this list now. And when you think about it, from the customer’s point of view, you know, we’re tired of those emails that are the same old stuff. And it’s like, you open it, you’re like, this isn’t even… this doesn’t relate to me in any way. And as a business, you need to actually strengthen those relationships with your customers, and actually give them the information that they care about. I know it’s a big lofty goal for us to really think about that customer relationship and being so dynamic, but it is possible with today’s technology. And that’s really what we’re trying to help businesses do and brands is understand their customers, so they can deliver them better services, better marketing messages, and in return, you know, get better ROI for everything that they’re doing.

Paul: So how did it start off? So you’re one of the Co founders, whos the other?

Annabel: So the other Co founder is Jeff, who’s our CTO, he’s also my husband. And we started the business because we wanted to get into music, right? Who doesn’t want to work in the music space?

Paul: So cool, So much money haha.

Annabel: Yeah, oh, yes haha, so much money, yes. Um, but we started in music, because we wanted to work with bands and help them understand their fans better, really. So we built this engine underneath it, and we raise some seed money and actually set up offices in Santa Monica. So we were in California for five years. And when we were down there, we were literally up the road from Universal Music Group. And it was that Kismet thing where you meet the right person who was like, we’re trying to understand our fans better. And we presented what our engine could do. And leave who’s lovely was like, Well, I don’t believe you, here is some customer data, run it through your engine.

And we can actually show him that these insights. So they could say see that a customer has signed up on the Justin Bieber site. But actually, the top artists that they’re listening to is Lady Gaga at the moment. So all of a sudden, their fan insights have exploded, because they’re able to tailor and personalise. So UMG was our first enterprise customer, and we did a trial. And then that went to a global licence. So all the labels globally use our technology. And then, year and a half ago, we got Sony Music, entertainment, as well. So they use us globally with all their labels, which is so exciting. And they’re really trying to, you know… the music industry is one of those ones that kind of didn’t keep up with the times, right, the technology changes. And there’s a lot of innovative people there at these labels, who are wanting to trial different things, and, you know, really talk to fans better.

So it’s been a really amazing ride. But I never thought we would end up with this pivot and sort of the customer insights layer, I really thought we were going to be direct to consumer, and sort of build out these fan experiences. But at the end of the day, you know, like, it makes sense for business, they want to own the customer. They want to have that direct relationship with their fans or their customers. So we’re really that white label service that sits behind the scenes helping them do that work.

Paul: Right. So you started off, specifically in the music industry. Now are you saying you have a wider scope?

Annabel: Yeah. We have, you know, almost 64% of the music industry, when you look at what’s out there, what we’re missing is all sort of the independent labels, management companies. And that’s where we first started with AE, so it’s very close to my heart. So we’re actually sort of submarine testing at the moment a self service platform for those groups. Because they have said to us over the past few years, we want to use your engine, I’m like, hang on we got to plug things in for an enterprise customer, right. So we need to build you a platform. So you can do it yourself right with your Mailchimp hook in and your different hook ins that you need, you know, your Google Analytics hook in.

So we’re building a self service platform. But at the same time, we’re sort of moving into our next vertical, which is gaming. So the idea is that, you know, we move into gaming, we start working with enterprise customers to understand the dynamics there, what are those issues that they have, and then take those learnings and then again, tweak the self service platform to suit smaller publishing houses and gaming groups, so that then they can use the engine as well. And that’s kind of the strategy that we’ve been developing is that, you know, it’s that classic marketing things like understand your customer, and then deliver what they want. So being able to use our enterprise customers, to figure out those key points. It’s been really key for us.

Paul: And you say that very first client was just down to more luck than anything else. Right person right time?

Annabel: It’s so interesting because people are like, Oh, did you have like a cousin working there? Or how did you… and we were just like, well, we had that perfect solution, that was exactly what they were looking for. And they hadn’t been able to find it anywhere else. So they literally didn’t believe that we had done it. And then we said, Here it is. And they were like, Whoa, you did do it.

Because it’s a very, you know, it’s a very complicated algorithm that’s running underneath listening to all these social networks and streaming services in real time. And then it filters that data. So you know, UMG doesn’t care what you ate for breakfast when you Instagram, because I’m sure you do that.

Paul: Oh, yeah, you must follow me.

Annabel: Yeah haha. But they do care about what you streamed while you were having your breakfast, right. So we take everyone’s data, and then we filter it, so that it’s only the stuff your brand cares about. Yeah. And the nice thing about it is that everyone’s view is going to be different. So if you look at a traditional customer profile, and Facebook, if your Coke, you are going to see the exact same profile that Pepsi sees when they look at this customer. Whereas inside of AE, we allow you to set up all these filters so that you can really understand Oh, Paul’s really into BMX biking, right? So we want to hit him with Powerade, right. So being able to like dig deeper into that so they can be more targeted.

Paul: So this is proper one to one personalised.

Annabel: At scale. Yes, exactly.

Paul: Wow, that’s very powerful stuff.

Annabel: Yeah, it is. It’s really exciting. And I think, you know, as marketers, we’re always trying to segment and improve and precision target. But there’s so much data at the moment, right. And it’s like, Oh, another tool. And I think part of the struggle with marketing our platform is by saying, this data is actually… it’s something you can do things with, you know, you will improve your open rates on your email newsletters, you are going to spend less money on advertising, because it’s far more targeted, and precise. You’re going to get higher click throughs.

So I like to think that, you know, with our software, really the proof is in the pudding, it’s getting that social login piece installed, so that as soon as that’s in the data starts to feed into the system. And I think that, you know, with the GDPR stuff that happened, the privacy, right, and Facebook and all these things, it’s so important that as marketers, we’re really looking at getting that first party consent from your end customer, right? So that they say yes, I allow you to look at my data, but in return for that, you are going to give me better products and services and deals right. And I really think that is the future of marketing. It’s that that true digital handshake that we’re going to have.

Paul: I think that’s very insightful. And I think that so often what’s happening is that that balance hasn’t been there, the people are willing to see more personalised messages. You know, I’m prepared to give something back. But it’s got to be a fair deal.

Annabel: Totally. And I think, for a long time brands, to be honest, the big brands haven’t needed to get personalised. They’re just like, oh, we’re doing pretty well. You know, people are buying our products are clicking on our newsletters. But with all the startups happening with all the new brands with Kickstarter, with everything that’s happening, finally, the big guys have gone Oh, I guess we do need to start treating our customers the more than just an email address, right? We need to treat them as an individuals.

Paul: So you guys been honing this platform now for a few years, you started off in music started at the top and working your way down. Are you doing the same? Well, I don’t know how much you can tell me. But are you doing the same with gaming? And you know, I guess as a platform, you could use this for any number of verticals.

Annabel: Yeah, exactly. So consumer goods, travel, I think there’s huge potential in the travel market, right, so many people are active on social media around travel. It’s really limitless, because the idea of the engine was always brands who want to better understand their customers. So if you’re a business that’s like, Oh, I really want to understand and segment and see improvements in my open rates. And, you know, use a seeded list of customers that are actually actively engaging with my brand, and go out and get new customers. You know, those are the people… and I have to say, it’s probably our system is really targeted at marketers who are already doing quite sophisticated work, right? And they’re going, there just has to be a better way of doing this.

What can I further do to fine tune what I’m actively doing? So that’s really, you know, who we’re working with at the moment. And I think, you know, marketers are getting so sophisticated now, with what they’re doing. There is that piece missing of all this disparate data? How do you bring it to a centralised place where that customer profile is changing over time, so you don’t feel like you’re guessing or missing out on something anymore.

Paul: So all those examples you gave were really good, really strong B2C markets? Do you think it could work in B2B?

Annabel: That’s a good question. You know,

Paul: Maybe the sources of information are a bit different. Maybe it’s LinkedIn feed or whatever.

Annabel: Yes, well we can definitely pick up LinkedIn, definitely, it certainly could work in that area, we haven’t really experimented with that. But I don’t see why not the engine is really built… that’s another thing about our engine is that, you know, we’ll pull in customer data from wherever, whether it’s a social network, whether it’s Google Analytics, whether it’s your own internal serum system you have or your…

Paul: There just data feeds to you.

Annabel: Exactly and so anything can come into the engine, then we filter process and produce these insights. So then we can push that data anywhere you needed to go, whether it’s Salesforce, where it’s MailChimp, whether it’s to your ad serving platform, whatever it is. And you know, for us, it’s really future proofing as well, right? Because I mean, we remember before there was Facebook, right? And one day, there will no longer be a Facebook, right? So all those other things that are going to happen, just making sure that our engine can consume all those pieces of information.

Paul: Yeah future proofing, do you have a MySpace feed?

Annabel: Yeah haha, totally. Yep. For what was his name? The first Myspace person… Tom, good old Tom, remember, he’d be your first friend on Myspace? Yeah, but I think it’s important thing for marketers to really think about right is that all these platforms are there. And quite often, you’re literally giving your customers to Facebook, when you’re using Facebook login, right, or vice versa, they get access to all of that data. And then they’re just giving you a tiny slice of when they want to show you. And that is one of the things that I want marketers to be able to do is to take their customer data back and say, You know what, we’re going to use your tool, Facebook, and we’re going to give you money, and you’re going to make us happy. That’s good. But I want to own my customers, right? I want to have a centralised database so that I can decide what I want to do with all my data.

Paul: So in terms of, you know, creating an Appreciation Engine, it sounds amazing. So how many people are involved in the business?

Annabel: That’s a really good question. So we have a core team, six at the moment here. And then we have support partners who are actually based in the UK, and they help us with our 24/7 support, because, you know, those are labels all over the world. We also have a couple of people down in California that also support us. But you know, we moved back to Victoria two years ago. And it was probably one of the best decisions we’ve made. Because I I really believe that if you are happy with your personal life, and what’s happened… there was an election going on down in the States.

Paul: Haha, I might of heard about that.

Annabel: Yeah. And we feel like Should we leave… we’re?w on TN visas. Right? So coming back here has been amazing, because, you know, it’s been 15 years since I’ve lived in Victoria. And, you know, the tech scene has just really exploded here. And it’s been so welcoming in the tech community. Because, you know, we were right there at Silicon beach, as it’s called. Right. And people are very aggressive, and not very collaborative. Whereas Canadians, not to a fault. I think it’s just how we are but we’re far more collaborative, and want to help other companies succeed. And we just didn’t get that sense of community in Santa Monica. Right. Even though we were right in the WeWork offices.

Paul: It’s just a lot more dog eat dog down there.

Annabel: Oh yeah. They’re literally like… it is like it is in the movies. They’re raising money on a napkin. Right? And then we’d have guys working next to us. And I’m like, did they do any work in that office? Like, all they’re doing is like playing video games and drinking beer. So it’s been so different to come back here and yeah, so amazing.

Paul: That’s not to say that people don’t play video game games and drink beer here.

Annabel: Yeah, but we do it after Friday at four o’clock. Right? Not like Monday morning at 10.

Paul: I think you’re right, I mean, I can’t vouch for anywhere else in Canada, I haven’t worked in any other tech community. But what I think Victoria has, you know, just interacting with companies here is it seems to be kind of right size, Goldilocks size. You know, it’s it’s not so big that people fly off all different angles, wherever it’s just the right size to people feel that they can talk to each other and collaborate and ask someone’s opinion because they just around the corner or whatever. So yeah, I think that’s that’s one of the really neat things about being here. Whether it’s the same and say, Vancouver or Toronto or Montreal or whatever. I have no idea. So in terms of sort of marketing insights. The marketing insight… my big takeaway at the moment is just go straight to the top.

Annabel: Haha, gotcha. That’s the easy way. It’ll only take you four years. But yeah.

Paul: But did you guys gain any insights? You know, in terms of, did you do any marketing, other than just by the sounds of it? Some very fortunate networking?

Annabel: Yeah, you know, I was really thinking about this. And the thing I kind of realised is that when we signed with Universal, we were like, awesome, we’re in the enterprise space. Now we’re going to play in the big with the big boys. And, you know, we modelled our brand, and our website, after our competitors in the space, and our competitors are crazy, well funded, they’re huge organisations.

And we thought to play in that space, we had to look and sound like those guys. And when we moved back to Victoria, my gut the whole time had been telling me this is not right for us and…

Paul: You’re living a lie.

Annabel: Yeah, totally, it felt like that, right? Because you’re always like, live your brand and your values, and you need to be authentic. And we rebranded about a year and a half ago, we totally changed our site. And as one of my team said to me, our competitors look like a corporate bank. And they do, right, but that’s what it’s like, in the enterprise space. It’s all about, you know, your case studies, super serious fill in this like 20 page lead form thing, to get your document.

We really decided that, that’s not, that’s not who we are, how we wanted to run our business. That’s not, you know, we’re so different when we go into an enterprise company, they’re like, Oh, you know, there aren’t like 20 layers of people. And yes, we have processes… and that, to me, has been my biggest learning about marketing our business, it is just be yourself. And it’s kinda imposter syndrome. You think you have to be just like these other people. And in fact, what we always say it’s like, you need to stand out from them. You just need to describe your process, describe your business clearly and be real about it. And people will respond to that. And, you know, we signed another enterprise deal after we do that, right. So I think it makes a huge difference.

Paul: So your big thing with Universal was they said, Can you do this? And you said, Well, we don’t know. And they said, well, we’ll give you some data and try. So some real honesty there, we’ve got this thing and don’t know what it can do.

Annabel: Yeah, totally. Yeah, we were like, We can take your data, and we can create all these profiles for you. And they were like, Oh, can you? We’re like, yes… they are like… Hmmmm, because, these guys are being pitched companies literally every day, right? It’s a very difficult position to be in. And it’s hard to get in there. But I really think if you’re getting into the enterprise space, you know, the proof is in the pudding, you actually need to develop that relationship, they will give you a tiny bit of whatever you need to actually show the value of your system. And that is really what we do now is by, you know, offering trials, paid trials with all our enterprise customers, but they want to see, right, because there’s a lot of smoke and mirrors in our profession. A lot. And I think that’s an actual real detriment for all sort of SaaS products. But um you have to cut through that. And that’s, you know, showing, what you can actually do.

Paul: That’s great. So here’s a thing I was just thinking about that, i’m curious about. So working with your husband, your better half?

Annabel: Yes.

Paul: Building this business together. That sounds quite stressful.

Annabel: Yes.

Paul: How do you guys manage it so that you just not talking about the business 24/7 Or maybe you are? What do you do to make sure that at the end of the day, you still have a relationship that is not about the business?

Annabel: Yes I get this question a lot. And so Jeff, and I have worked together for 15 years. And I would say for the first seven years, when we stepped in the door, or when we used to work out of our house, right? When it was like 7pm, I’m like the work day is over. And I would say that’s it, we’re not allowed to talk about work anymore. Right? I need a separation from work and home. And that did not work. In fact, a probably cause more problems. Because Jeff is always germinating something right?

Paul: Yeah, his subconscious just ticking away.

Annabel: It is. He wants to be able to talk about those things. And so once I lifted my ban it made a huge difference. And, you know, to be honest, sometimes I’ll be like, it’s Sunday at three o’clock. Could we not talk about this right now? Can we talk about it tomorrow morning, but I am a lot more open about that. It’s a huge part of our lives, and you can’t really separate it from what we do so…

Paul: But it’s much harder to get that work life balance then anyone in a normal situation, not that you’re in an abnormal situation. It’s a very common situation. But in such situations which is a situation I’ve been in as well, so…

Annabel: so you know.

Paul: I know exactly what it’s like and everybody manages it differently.

Annabel: Yeah, I think the other thing that I’ve really realised is that we had a startup, and then we had a kid, and we still have a startup and a kid. And I didn’t realise, of course, right, it was going to have a huge impact on your life, but it’s really made me realise that there’s more important things some days than the business, right? It does give you that perspective. And I didn’t really expect that to happen with the business side, right? And it really has allowed me to sometimes just step back and be like, Whoa, we need to chill out about whatever we’re discussing, because there’s other stuff we need to be doing right. There’s more important things. So that’s actually been a huge, you know… they say kids teach you lessons. Well there was my first one, like right away, right? It’s like, we’re not saving lives at our technology, but we are helping people do their work more efficiently.

Paul: That sounds great. Thank you very much. I really enjoyed talking to you.

Annabel: Yeah, you too Paul. Thank you.

Paul: I hope you enjoyed my conversation with Annabel. For more info on Appreciation Engine please visit get.theappreciationengine.com for more info about this show. And to get our links to iTunes, Google Play SoundCloud, Stitcher and YouTube, check out www.remixcave.com And if you have any SaaS marketing insights that you’d like to share on the show, please get in touch. Until next time.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The post Ep. 22: Building A Customer Insights Engine with Annabel Youens appeared first on 47 Insights.

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-22-customer-insights-engine-annabel-youens/feed/ 0 It's unlikely you have ever heard of Appreciation Engine yet 64% of the music industry use the customer insights engine to understand customers and music fans. Co-Founder and CMO Annabel Youens explains how the SaaS platform works and their plans for t... It's unlikely you have ever heard of Appreciation Engine yet 64% of the music industry use the customer insights engine to understand customers and music fans. Co-Founder and CMO Annabel Youens explains how the SaaS platform works and their plans for the gaming industry and beyond. 47 Insights yes 25:35
Ep. 21: Paid Campaigns with Duane Brown of Take Some Risk http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-21-paid-campaigns-duane-brown-take-some-risk/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-21-paid-campaigns-duane-brown-take-some-risk/#respond Mon, 19 Nov 2018 13:00:18 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=968 With experience running search and paid social campaigns for SaaS companies in Europe, Australia and North America, Duane Brown of Take Some Risk chats about what he has learned about marketing SaaS, and how it differs from e-commerce marketing.

The post Ep. 21: Paid Campaigns with Duane Brown of Take Some Risk appeared first on 47 Insights.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 21: Duane Brown, Take Some Risk

With experience running search and paid social campaigns for SaaS companies in Europe, Australia and North America, Duane Brown of Take Some Risk chats about what he has learned about marketing SaaS, and how it differs from e-commerce marketing.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


Subscribe to the SaaS Marketing Insights Audio Podcast

You can also subscribe to SaaS Marketing Insights as an audio podcast.

Listen on Apple Podcasts?Listen on Google Play Music

Visit the?Podcast page to get links for other podcast networks and details of forthcoming episodes.


Episode 21 Transcript

Paul: On today’s show, I have an interview with Duane Brown, founder of Take Some Risk. Hope you enjoy it. Duane Brown, welcome to SaaS Marketing Insights.

Duane: Cool. Thanks for having me. Appreciate it, Paul.

Paul: So you’re right over there, over the sea miles and miles away, in Vancouver.

Duane: Yeah, not that far. I tell people it’s like a four hour trip and they always think I’m crazy but i’m Like, an hour, then a 2 hour ferry, it’s far. It’s far for Canada.

Paul: Yeah, yeah. But you’ve not always worked in in Canada. Are you Canadian. I guess you’re Canadian?

Duane: Yeah, I am Canadian. I get the question a lot. Yeah. I mean, there was a couple years in the UK, lived in London. Then in Australia for about seven months working for one of the telecoms down there.

Paul: So yeah. So tell me about how you got started in marketing and specifically SaaS marketing, because you’ve worked a lot… I know you do a range of stuff now. But you’ve worked a lot with SaaS in the past.

Duane: Yeah, I mean, it’s mostly because I went to live in the UK. And there’s just more opportunity to work on like, tonnes of things. Because they have bigger budgets. And, you know, London is the gateway to Europe, much like, you know, New York. So you could say it’s the gateway to the rest of North America in terms of advertising and where clients spend tonnes of money. So worked on like, a lot of SaaS related brands, more of a consumer focus standpoint, got to work a lot of e-commerce as well. Just getting a lot more international experience and like managing a team, and working on things in multiple countries in multiple languages.

So we worked on Asos, we were in like 15 different countries, we had three different languages. And I was managing a team of three, plus me, and just trying to like make sure everything from like what we say in America versus what we say in Canada, or the UK, or in Australia, or in Germany, or Amsterdam. Any of those places, were all correct, and keeping it all in flow. And so when I was done with London, because I couldn’t renew my visa, and I went travelling to Asia for a bit, I got a job offer just to work on Unbounce for a couple years. And then I quit that was to start the company. Namely they took me because they needed someone with international experience. There’s not tonnes of that in Vancouver. And they’d be looking for probably a year and change. And so they were, I wouldn’t say desperate, but they really, really wanted to find someone.

Paul: So your role on Unbounce was like purely paid, purely pay per click or were you doing a mix of stuff?

Duane: A mix of stuff. So I mean, most of our spending was on AdWords, but we had Bing, Facebook with Comcast, we had display anything marketing related. As you can imagine, I probably had every vendor, try to email me and just like let’s just chat… I’m like No, I’m good, Excel, AdWords editor, old school, you know, a way of thinking in some ways, but like tools are not going to solve your basic problems if your numbers aren’t profitable.

Paul: What you mean there’s not an AI solution to all of this, come on.

Duane: Yeah no, there’s not an AI solution. I sometimes tell clients, like we need less technology, if you want to be successful, not more technology, like more people, more technology just makes everything more complicated.

So yeah, we just we focused on that we did a bit of Facebook in my last like eight months, and just doing a lot more on video marketing on Facebook and trying to figure out how to grow that channel. So yeah a good experience.

Paul: Cool, and so when did you set up? Take some risk?

Duane: I quit my job in January last year? If you asked the government they would probably say like Janurary 10th or something like that, emotionaly for me, it was like January 1st. I had emotionally decided this was the way I was going to go. And I just started like, focusing all my free time on the company and like what we’re going to call it, register and all that sort of admin business stuff that people don’t always think about when you start a company.

Paul: And so, you know, with your business being so new, and I say that because my business is pretty new as well.

I guess we’re in a similar situation in some respects to to sort of like finding new clients and finding out which clients you want to work with and which ones you really don’t want to work with. Are you still working with a mixer clients? Do you still work with SaaS clients, or, you know, you’re doing more ecommerce?

Duane: I mean, we have like half our clients are in e commerce, a third are in sort of like technology, B2B, SaaS that sort of space, then the rest are like sort of Legion or other sort of odd things that not listed categories. And it’s a some mix of like… my network will send me stuff or we have a few partners in Toronto that send us stuff if they can’t do the work, they’ll send us the client directly. And we just decide if we want to take it or not. Most clients who email us, we take on board because we usually weed them out by pricing. Like, you know, people think we’re too expensive and so don’t stick with us. And that’s okay. And then other people will say, Yeah, you’re expensive, but we get what we’re paying for. And so we work with them.

Paul: Yeah, so we won’t name names, but you and I had a conversation I I referred someone to you, based on the fact that, you know, I think you guys got much more ecommerce experience than I have. I’m just working really… only with SaaS clients now. And, you know, I knew about your Asos experience, and I just thought, yeah, you know, that a much better fit. And I’d much rather the client work with somebody who’s got that kind of experience. And, you know, you can get results quicker, you got much more experience. So, you know, it’s a better fit. And I think that’s, that’s always important to try and be a bit of a matchmaker with finding clients to work with the right people.

Duane: Yeah, no, I agree with that. It’s true. I mean, we generally say we want clients who are nice, they have an interesting problem to solve, you know, like, with the client, you’re talking about, they, they don’t do tonnes of digital stuff. The problem is like, how do you how do you kind of start from square one more or less, other clients, they have things going, but it’s not going the direction they want, they have leads, they don’t convert, or they’ve hired three people and all those people brought in, you know, leads of people sign up for an account, but they didn’t convert into like paying customers, which I see a lot.

I sometimes joke… our best customers are those who’ve been through two or three other agencies and have been disappointed, they would be abit tougher than they would normally be, because they want to make sure they find a really good fit. So yeah, we work with like all kinds of clients, which is cool. And also like we work with people that pay the invoices. You know, we want people to pay the invoice.

Paul: Old school, imagine getting paid for what you do, Haha.

Duane: I know we have one client that fired us the other day, because we were too honest, we told him this wasn’t a good idea, and we weren’t going to do it. Then they fired us. And now they’re trying to not pay their final invoice, which makes me a little bit frustrated. But I told him, I’m going to keep at it, I’m going to be really annoying about it because like we did the work. We know you’re right. Like we don’t think you should spend money to run this test that you’re not going to have results in a week for, then ask me how it performed and I’m not be able to give you an answer. And then we would have wasted your time and money and my time because this wasn’t a worthwhile test. I suggested this to the client, like we could have run tests on ad copy, or targeted or other things that were just more worthwhile than trying to test the landing page when you don’t have enough conversions to test that. So it’s unfortunate that we lost a client, but I’m glad I lost a client because because I stuck to my values and things that are really important to us as a company and organisation.

Paul: Yeah, absolutely. I mean… I think the classic thing there is you don’t have a dog and bark yourself, if you you hire an expert to do something for you. And then they give you their advice or recommendation and you don’t take it and you want to sort of like control them like a puppet on a string. You know, that’s frustrating for everybody. And you know, they’re not going to get the best service from an expert in that situation.

Duane: No they won’t. What I said in my one of my emails like… you hired us for a reason. Please listen to me this is this will be a waste of money and time. With any client, we say we don’t think this is a good idea, we always give two or three other recommendations of things they can do, because we want to like test things and try things out when it makes sense. And they’ll see the outcome they want to see or the words and they want to see, in this case running a test for a week is like you don’t have enough traffic, and you don’t have enough money. And they just didn’t really seem to believe they they didn’t have enough money. I’m like you’re not going to spend 40K in the next week. Because like you just you just not going to, noone I know is going to do that. Asos wouldn’t even do that if I told them I need to spend 40K next week to run a test, they would be like, you’re crazy Duane.

Paul: So given the diversity of the clients that you’re working with, interested in hearing, you know, your view on whether you see any trends that are kind of across different industries right now, in terms of platforms, in terms of campaign types, in terms of things that aren’t working so well, or what you see happening in terms of, you know, trends or developments. So for example, I don’t know if you do stuff in in Europe, but…

Duane: We have a couple clients. Yeah.

Paul: Yeah, yeah, whether you’re seeing the effect that the privacy law changes over there having with campaigns or anything like that.

Duane: Yeah, I mean, with GDPR, we definitely see a drop in traffic for our clients that do stuff in Europe, and get a good chunk of their the business from Europe. So that’s challenging, like how do we run campaigns and how do we do remarketing and even just from like, an SEO perspective, you know, what can and can’t you capture about this person’s identity or traits. So it’s definitely a challenge there across our clients that we do stuff in Europe for and across schema in general. I don’t think GDPR is a is a bad thing. You know, I tell those people, it’s actually a good thing to give control to customers maybe, it wasn’t promoted in the best way. So people didn’t know about it as fast as they should have.

No the transition was definitely not great. It doesn’t mean it wasn’t a bad idea.

Paul: The transition was not great, Haha. No, long term it’s good.

Duane: Yeah, yeah. So I think there’s that. We also see a lot more clients, you know, start out on Shopify, in terms of like, you know, an e commerce platform, whether it’s they want to test if their idea works, or it’s just what they hear about. So you know, Shopify, from the outside, I feel like their technique to market is brute force, we’re just going to hire a crap tonne of people and just brute force the way to the top. And it seems like it’s working, because the more people we talk to, the more people are on Shopify versus like, a WooCommerce and Magento, which are kind of the other options I think a lot of people go with in this space.

I think among our e commerce clients, I think more and more find it a bit more expensive to be on Facebook and a bit more challenging. There’s definitely a bit more competition there. But that’s, that’s okay. Because more competition means we know people who are not really good at Facebook, they will just read out really bad agencies, we all talked to enough clients who worked with that, you know, Guru special agency that just didn’t deliver or even past clients who’ve had agencies where the only way they could drive a sale was with a sales ad of some sort of discount. Some clients have no discounts, no giveaway. If isn’t willing to pay full price. They’re probably not a great customer.

Paul: Yeah. So that’s e commerce. Do you see anything that’s in the kind of SaaS world changing in terms of paid advertising?

Duane: I don’t think anything’s changing majorly I think it’s business as usual. In the sense that, you know, well obviously Google and Facebook, they gear a lot of their stuff towards e commerce. So it’s like, figure out how you’re going to convert customers on you know, AdWords and Bing, figure out if you’re going to do video as part of your mix on YouTube or Facebook, and just really nail down the basics there. For one client, we did some work with in Q1, he wanted help with organising their accounts and stuff like that. And just making sure that the person internally was doing a really good job, we found some really good success on Yahoo. We had three search engines, then we lost it to two search engines. And now we’re back to three. Yeah, it was kind of a nice surprise for the client and they’ve kept it running, and they’re happy. And it’s just… even though it’s not a lot of growth compared to what you would get on Bing. It’s incremental growth. I think that’s what we realise, you can’t just be on one platform.

Paul: No you don’t want all your eggs in one basket.

Duane: Yeah. Which a lot of clients do. ‘We’ve got Google, so we’re good’. Well, people don’t spend all their time on google, all their time on Facebook, you need to be in a few places, and help them quite figure that out is the big thing right now, because they don’t have a big enough budget, they need to figure out how much do I spend on each platform to like, get the maximum amount of people?

Paul: Yeah, yeah, it’s how you divide the budget up and, you know, is a Facebook conversion, say the same value as a Google one, or, I don’t know, Twitter, or LinkedIn, or whatever. I mean, it’s… and with SaaS in particular, I mean, people come in and trial at a certain price. But you know, until the trial converts to paid, you don’t really know what the value of that account or customer is going to be. So it’s always tricky.

Duane: It is definitely always tricky. We took on a client in Australia back in April. And I signed the contract quick, just before I boarded a flight to go to Italy to a conference. So I think for that client, because they’re based in Australia, and in their SaaS, obviously, there’s a talent shortage. But for them, it really is figuring out what what’s the difference between someone signs up for an account. And when they convert, like, what’s that lead time? Is there a difference from what they see across other channels, which right now, it seems like there’s about a week difference, like it takes a little bit longer from someone on Google to confer, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. We just need to keep it in mind when we run experiments and stuff like that. And also, they’re smaller. So how do we compete with like, the bigger brands in the space that have more money and more budget and stuff like that?

Paul: Yeah. How to spend that money wisely.

Duane: Yeah, yeah. So you know, it’s like, there’s brand campaigns, there’s competitor campaigns, we have some new marketing going, you know, for them… because of the content on the blog, like dynamic search, ads didn’t really work. But it was a good test run to see if that would be worthwhile for them. So we just hone in on the basics of getting it right, because they’ve hired a couple people in the past year and a half. And they kept on saying ‘we want someone internally. I get the logic behind that, you know, there’s… paying them full time could make sense. But I think now they’ll glad they hired me even it was a year. They realised while we consistently have conversions, the last three months, the other people got, like, a couple conversions in one month and two months of nothing. So it’s very night and day difference in terms of performance.

Paul: So here’s an interesting question or something I come across a lot. How do you deal with people who say, ‘yeah, we just want you to test some stuff, we just want you to, you know, review the account. That’s fine. Yeah. And if you can do that for nothing. And then, what we’re thinking is, we just have a rolling monthly contract’. Is that… because what I’ve seen in my experience, is it takes a long time to really understand and get to the bottom of what’s really working. And you know, it depends on volume and spend and all that stuff. But I wonder if you come across, you know, similar kind of questions?

Duane: I mean, yeah, we did it the other day, someone referred someone to us. And we talked and they were like, Oh, we were thinking like, could we do something for like a few days, a few weeks? And I was like, well, that’s not enough time, even with like, what we do on Facebook for app instal in terms of a campaign or tell them what we could do something for a month and see how it works out. I could consultant on stuff for you is another option. So we did have someone come up, it was like an interesting opportunity. I’m like, well, we’ll do a month if you want to do a month test but I wouldn’t do anything less than that. And a preferred client will do three months, and then have it just go month to month after that, just because we need to be able to like figure out like, what’s working, what’s not, we need time to dig into the data. For any client we bring on board we’ll audit all their systems, make sure things are set up correctly, because I find other agencies don’t always do that and start building things around stuf that’s broken.

Paul: Yeah, you start building your marketing on top of some really bad conversion tracking or, you know, metrics, just meaningless. It’s a nightmare.

Duane: It is a nightmare. Even just like really bad Facebook pixels, with the climate that fired us… the other agency, I don’t know what they did with the pixel, I just couldn’t get it to work. When we started with a new pixel, we started to see results within a few weeks. And it’s so… it’s like, well, taking someone else’s work sometimes isn’t always great, because agencies say they do things, but they don’t always do it to like your standards.

Paul: Yeah. So I was having a conversation yesterday with a fellow marketer. And we were talking about… that’s the bit that clients never really want to pay you for, you know, when you when you go through, and you have to fix all of this stuff. And like, make sure that the conversion tracking is working thoroughly. And you know, all the weird things that you can have happen with Tag Manager, and checking that stuff, it’s really time consuming, but like, no one ever wants to pay for it. That’s stuff that’s just part of the deal that you got to do. So that you can, you know, build your campaigns on something and solid.

Duane: Yeah, I mean, we really enjoy doing that stuff that audit and stuff, I think it’s good to kind of get an understanding of what’s going on and clients…

Paul: It’s part of the discovery as well.

Duane: Yeah, it’s part of the discovery. And it leads to a good way to ask questions. And we’ve had people who’ve hired us just to do audits and stuff like that, which we enjoy, like, audit, you know, Adwords, GA, GTM, all of those, one of those accounts, which we’ll do as well, we’ll audit something for our flat fee rate. But we’ve never started without doing an audit. If someone said we want you to start tomorrow and launch campaigns. I’m like, well no, I need to audit first to make sure things are set up correctly. And I quite frankly, rather lose a client, because they really want me to start tomorrow and can’t because if I start and those things are broken. I’m just going to fail.

Paul: Absolutely. Yeah. It also shows a lack of, like serious intent or commitment. You know, if you were just like, yeah, we’ve got this all in place to start, you know, just just just make it better and cheaper.

Duane: Yeah, I mean, we tell clients, like if everything’s done correctly, I could probably get through it all in half a day and check it really quickly. But if things aren’t broken, well, that’s going to take longer, but I’d rather spend half a day and just double check then always wonder if something’s broken.

Paul: Cool, so you’re a year in and I think you guys are hiring at the moment. Is that right?

Duane: Yeah, we’re trying to find like a technical SEO person. And then we’re trying to find like a paid manager helping out with some Google Shopping Stuff and Bing shopping stuff on a few other areas. And so much like Australia, it’s tight to find real qualified people in Vancouver, they’re got real good experience. It’s also like, beyond that, have they spent their whole life in Vancouver, have they been somewhere else, or they were once and also they moved here is ok, but there’s a lot of people who have only ever lived and done marketing in Vancouver, and it doesn’t give them enough perspective, like what’s out there. And also the budgets for campaigns and Vancouver pretty small compared to like what you get in New York, or Toronto or London. So it’s been a challenge to find some really, really good experienced who’s done more than like, you know, some basic stuff.

Paul: So have you thought about growing your own talent? Or? Or is that just too time consuming at this stage?

Duane: It’s time consuming. It takes a lot of work. And I would already be working more hours than it currently am. Which is…

Paul: That defies the whole point really?

Duane: Yeah, so like our goal is to find someone with five years experience, the idea is that they’ve worked a couple places, I mean, if they only worked one place, you know, we’ll chat with him definitely. And go from there, if someone had, like three or four years experience i’d probably definitely chat with them but if you only have like one or two, you’re gunna need a lot more training, we just don’t have the resources to do that. And one of our pitches to clients, as well is like, we only hire senior people, right? We only have people who’ve got a good set of experience, and we bring them in and we show them how we do things and sort of help them scale up their skills and their ability. Clients come to us with high expectations sometimes.

Paul: Yeah, yeah. Because I think we’ve had a conversation before and you’ve alluded to the fact that, you know, your cost structure or whatever, or, you know, your billing structure isn’t really, you know, straightforward. It’s not the industry norm. And so, you know, you’re effectively pitching yourself as a as a premium service, and you want premium clients. And so yeah, that’s part of your, your package isn’t it?

Duane: Yeah, I mean, like, we do definitely build differently. I mean, we do a monthly strategy with clients than we do 10% of spend of everthign we directly manage. You know, I often tell clients, we’re not expensive, but we’re not the cheapest in town either, we’re somewhere in the mushy middle, I could find a dozen people who are probably more expensive and find 1000 people that are cheaper, but you get what you pay for at the end of the day, if you want Junior people on your account, go with a cheaper agency, that’s totally cool, you want someone a little bit more experience who will give you a bit more time of day and doesn’t need to take on 20,30 clients, then you come to us because at any time, we’ll have you know, 6 to 8, maybe if I hired a six person will go up to 12 clients, you know, some are long term. Some are project based, depending on what it is, but we wouldn’t go above that. Because we don’t need to, we don’t need to right, we don’t need to scale up and hire tonnes of people. We don’t need to have a huge office. Those are what got the big guys in trouble now they have to do everything basically at their scale.

Paul: Yeah, So what you’re saying is, Take Some Risk is small, but beautiful.

Duane: Yeah. Small but Beautiful. And we’re attentive, we care.

Paul: Yeah. And just a hand full clients. So you get a better service and everybody gets to deal with you.

Duane: Yeah, everyone gets to deal with me and the team i’m trying to like build around me to be better, because I can’t, I can’t do everything. Which is why when I hire technical SEO person full time, we also have some part time right now we want to find somebody who wants to go full time. Just because we have demand and clients are like, well, you’re doing this with paid, you know, what can you do with technical SEO or SEO in general? Well, let me show you what we can do. We’ve got two clients, we’re doing it for now. And so we just want to like, get more of that and help more clients do the right things to get them to where they want to go.

Paul: Great. So what do you think? This is my final question. What do you think, Take Some Risk looks like in three years time or five years time? How big can you get and still be small?

Duane: You know, I think that’s a really hard question, I would be happy. If there was like a dozen of us, you know, maybe eight of us somewhere between those two numbers. And we had like a handful of clients. Depending on I guess if everyone was in Vancouver, maybe we’d have our own small office. And then an idea I’ve been toying with because I think there’s a need in Vancouver and even on the island is doing kind of like a general assembly, red Academy brain station type thing, but only focused on like data and analytics. And so like we’d had that sort of education, corporate space, the other half is space to like, basically bring in more revenue stream for the company in different ways. And, and we like to teach and educate in general like us going to five conferences in the last five days and about two more committed for the year. So a way to teach more clients, the local market, cuz there’s some clients here, I don’t want to work for brands that I would love to work on. But I also know they only want to hire me full time. This seems like a good way to like connect with those people get to work with them, but in a non official capacity, if you will.

Paul: Yeah. That’s great. Well, it sounds like you’re doing some fantastic work all the way over there in Vancouver.

I should pop over and we should have a face to face, a coffee chat at some point. But alas, it’s not going to be today.

Duane: Yeah, totally Come on, hang out. We can like grab food something like that. Go for lunch. I mean I don’t drink coffee, but like I do drink juice and ginger beer and stuff like that.

Paul: Okay, well, we can do that. Duane. Thank you very much for your time it was really great to… you know, you’re the first person that I’ve done on this podcast with zoom. And also you the first fellow PPC guy that I’ve spoken to. And you know, you don’t know what you don’t know until you speak to somebody else. So thank you very much. I thought it was really insightful.

Duane: Cool. Thanks for having me, I appreciate it Paul.

Paul: No worries. Take it easy.

I hope you enjoyed my conversation with Duane. For more info on Take Some Risk, please visit www.takesomerisk.com for more info about this show. And to get our links to iTunes Google Play SoundCloud, Stitcher and YouTube check out www.remixcave.com. And if you have any SaaS marketing insights that you’d like to share on the show, please get in touch. Until next time.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The post Ep. 21: Paid Campaigns with Duane Brown of Take Some Risk appeared first on 47 Insights.

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-21-paid-campaigns-duane-brown-take-some-risk/feed/ 0 With experience running search and paid social campaigns for SaaS companies in Europe, Australia and North America, Duane Brown of Take Some Risk chats about what he has learned about marketing SaaS, and how it differs from e-commerce marketing. With experience running search and paid social campaigns for SaaS companies in Europe, Australia and North America, Duane Brown of Take Some Risk chats about what he has learned about marketing SaaS, and how it differs from e-commerce marketing. 47 Insights yes 25:23
Ep. 20: Launching Shift with Nadia Tatlow of Redbrick http://www.remixcave.com/blog/launching-shift-nadia-tatlow-redbrick/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/launching-shift-nadia-tatlow-redbrick/#respond Mon, 12 Nov 2018 13:00:28 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=962 Nadia Tatlow, General Manger of Shift app at Redbrick, outlines how she went about launching the product on Product Hunt and driving traffic through Google and Facebook.

The post Ep. 20: Launching Shift with Nadia Tatlow of Redbrick appeared first on 47 Insights.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 20: Nadia Tatlow, Redbrick

Nadia Tatlow, General Manger of Shift app at Redbrick, outlines how she went about launching the product on Product Hunt and driving traffic through Google and Facebook.

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 20 Transcript

Paul: Hello and Welcome to SaaS marketing insights The show where we ask SaaS founders, CEOs, marketers and investors about the lessons they’ve learned in their quest to grow their companies. My name is Paul Stephenson, and I’m founder and CEO of SaaS marketing agency 47Insights. On today’s show, I have an interview with Nadia Tatlow, General Manager at Shift. Hope you enjoy it.

Nadia from Redbrick, thank you very much for inviting me, what a great place you got here.

Nadia: Thanks for coming.

Paul: So this is Victoria, British Columbia. I don’t know a lot about Redbrick, but you guys are like a software company or whatever… so maybe we should back up and hear a bit more about your journey and how you got started in SaaS marketing and about Redbrick, and one of your… one of your products that Redbrick has in particular.

Nadia: Sure. Um, so I started at Redbrick about five years ago, and moved here from Toronto, where I was working at a marketing agency working with, you know, some of the big big brands through this agency. You know, Microsoft and Rogers and kind of some of those big, big brands, but we were a small agency kind of start up in that world. So we… you know, I really got my toes wet in the marketing world there. And then moved out to Victoria about five years ago, and started with Redbrick. At the time Shift was not not in the fold yet. So Redbrick for people who don’t know, is a software development company, we developed several different products. And in our… we have about four different business units. So shift is one of those. And so that’s the one that I’m heading up from a business perspective right now. And it’s our SaaS product for Gmail, Gmail management, it’s really a productivity app. It covers a lot of different, different tools. But really, it’s about helping people to manage different… all of their different email accounts from Gmail, Outlook, and Hotmail. And then, recently, we’ve added the ability to switch between all of your web apps and extensions as well.

Paul: Wow, so it sounds like Shift came about as an idea that maybe somebody was developing or an idea that came out of Redbrick at least, and then it was commercialised, or was it from the start or commercial idea?

Nadia: I think it came out of an internal need, really. So I guess to backtrack a little bit when I started here, you know, all of us were really working across several different products.

Paul: So you had different identities…

Nadia: Different identities, different brands within the Redbrick umbrella company. So managing all the different email accounts and brands was something that we all recognised as a kind of internal pain point.

Paul: Lots of different tabs in your browser.

Nadia: Yeah exactly, multiple tabs, multiple browsers. So we started looking into options and,? really didn’t find something that really clicked with us. So we decided, you know… at the time to also showcase one of our analytics… software analytics products, let’s build Shift as a, almost a case study. So we built it, we use it internally. And then I was really in a, you know, full on marketing across the red brick products at the time really.

Paul: Group marketing manager.

Nadia: You know, really managing marketing across everything. Yeah, exactly. So I got involved early on, I guess, spring of 2016, you know, naming the product to building out this brand of what is Shift and what is kind of the brand identity that we want it to have. And then we launched it to a really small design community, a beta community…

Before Product Hunt, actually. So in… I think it was September of 2016, we launched on this beta website, just to kind of get it out there and get it beyond our companies. And, and it, it really got a positive reception from there. So we thought, you know what, let’s, let’s really go hard for the last quarter and make this something that we can present to the world on Product Hunt. So that was all of our first time on Product Hunt. We we built up to that and in December, actually December 20th, we launched full on with Shift 1.0 on Product Hunt.

Paul: So how did you do that, was it on Product Hunt?

So, what was the reception?

Nadia: It was great. Yeah… Product Hunt, if you’re not familiar with the community is kind of product savvy, Silicon Valley Tech people…

Paul: I’m in there, upvo ting.

Nadia: Yeah. Okay. There’s actually a lot of Victoria companies that are on there now. And actually, in in those times or in that time, you couldn’t pre schedule your launch in any way. So you couldn’t really prep things…

Paul: They got that ship…

Nadia: The Ship product now that allows you to kind of line things up. So for us, it was really launching at midnight, everything. We didn’t have our link until that moment. And of course, we had a lot of other channels that we were you know, launching on to really create the momentum on Product Hunt that we needed.

Paul: So what’s with the midnight launches?

Nadia: Timing, maximizing your time zones. So I guess, PST, we’re, you know… we’re a little bit behind the time. Yeah. So getting on there at midnight allows you to capture, you know, all those CEOs and, anyone who’s in the tech world that’s getting online in Europe, you know.

Paul: So it’s midnight where?

Nadia: So midnight PST? And that’s supposed to be the, you know… it’s really 12:01 that you launch on there. Yeah, there’s lots of blog articles about product launches. And I have a checklist that I’m, you know… I follow religiously when i’m going through those.

Paul: So you launched it on some other platforms as as well?

Nadia: Yeah. So I guess backstory on Redbrick is that, you know, we’re really… our bread and butter has been performance marketing. So, you know, user acquisition, and in Facebook and Google are kind of everything in terms of all of our products is where we, you know test and drive user acquisition. So it’s no different with Shift.

Paul: So that’s the core kind of, well, obviously, developing software, but but also performance marketing side. Those two go hand in hand. Without… all of the other products have sprung out from from those central skills that the expertise that you have within this business.

Nadia: Yeah, I think just being able to use those channels for testing, testing and gathering data and just driving large volumes.

Paul: Validation.

Nadia: Yeah, exactly. Yeah, getting… I mean, getting anything to scale. And, you know, we have talked about this before, but sometimes we’ll have a creative idea, you know, a new landing page or ad sets, and Facebook has been a huge, huge channel for Shift, just in that it allows us to test all of that stuff. Pretty quickly in the scheme of things, so, you know, we’ll have a brand new landing page, that’s not even quite ready. So we’ll create a bunch of ads around it and just test and see if those work. One example is we recently launched a light theme on Shift. So you can switch, sort of, like on Twitter where you can switch between dark mode and light mode, we have a similar feature for Shift, you know, really just a nice setting for people who, you know, care about the UI and want it to flow with their workflow. So we tested alot of ads on Facebook to make sure that, you know… before we go to the effort of really pushing this through development, let’s make sure that this is something that our customers are going to respond to.

Paul: So great. So shift is what, 18 months old?

Nadia: Yeah, so I’d say December 2016, was really the full on launch. Then November, so we had this launch on Product Hunt that went very well. And at the time Shift was really email management. So managing multiple email accounts and being able to toggle between those accounts as well as mail calendar and drive. Shift is built on Electron so similar to Slack or Spotify, it sits on your desktop. And it’s beautiful at you know… I think where it kicked off was that the design community loved it. And it’s something that just really streamlines your productivity. So what we we kept on getting requests for was apps and extension. So you know, a lot of people are in email all day, but they need their CRM and they need project management or Facebook, business manager, Asana, Trello, Flow in there. So we started building in the apps, and spent, I guess, that full year really pushing out, pushing those apps into Shift and then building a feature called unified search, which allows you to search across all of your different email accounts.

Paul: Wow, that sounds clever. I bet that gave someone a headache.

Nadia: Yeah, yeah, exactly. So you can… if you accidentally saved a document in your personal account, you can search across everything, and you know, it’s supposed to be in your work, work drive, you’ll find it in in one search rather than…

Paul: Wow. There’s definitely a need for that.

Nadia: Yeah, exactly. So we built in unified search, more Google services, all your Google Apps, and then pretty much every popular web app. We threw that into Shift as part of the 2.0 launch, so we actually went back on Product Hunt, and back to that community as part of a really an organic push, but also something to really drive our team to a deadline. And, it’s been great for that and great for feedback. But of course, you know, Facebook has been really the the driving channel for the full, I guess, 18 months that it’s, it’s been out there in the public.

Paul: So, so the products really developed. So in terms of… it’s a freemium business model right? Or is it trial?

Nadia: So no trial, that’s another thing we’ve tested a huge amount. Pricing and trial offering, offering a trial or not offering the trial. So when we first launched, we did offer a trial, and we actually decided that it was more effective for our users to offer just a completely free version of Shift so you get an idea of, of how it all works and switch between two different email accounts in the free version.

Paul: So it’s kind of limited?

Nadia: A little bit limited. Yes. But you can see how it works. See if it works on your desktop and how you have your monitor setup. And then we added… you can upgrade to Pro. And that’s a yearly subscription fee of $29.99.

Paul: Pocket money.

Nadia: Yeah, exactly, per year, we’re kind of… a lot of people, I think, assume that its monthly, they don’t read it carefully, it’s actually only per year. So that allows you unlimited email accounts. And then once you go to an into advanced, that’s really where the real I think value and premium version of Shift is where you can add all of your apps, all of your extensions, unlimited email accounts, Google services, unified search.

Paul: So does it have any kind of organisational vitality in the same way that Slack does, do you see people like adopting it? And then it spreads throughout an organisation?

Nadia: Yeah, you know, what we’ve… we’ve actually got a shift for teams offering that’s doing quite well. Because, you know, people are always talking in the office, you know, what do you use for productivity, how do you focus? How do you get your stuff done? The thing we found about our users is that Shift is a staple in their day to day workflow, they have it open every single day all day.

Paul: It’s earned its place.

Nadia: Yeah, exactly. So our engagement is really high. And, as a result… I think word of mouth has been big, with a network effect, with our referral programme, that in terms of organic marketing… and we push our referral programme, through our email campaigns and a little bit through Facebook and Google, but that team version is really, you know, someone on the team, whether they’re technically the decision maker, in terms of the software, productivity software, often it spirals. We have teams every day that started around five people. And then, you know, we get a request, okay lets add five more seats, let’s add 10 more seats, you know, so, yeah.

Paul: So, to back up, so I just wanted to sanity check somthing because… I do a lot of stuff in SaaS marketing, paid acquisition. So you doing paid acquisition on Facebook for something that’s $29 a year?

Nadia: Mmmm hmmm.

Paul: Wow.

Nadia: Well, you know, what… Well, $29 or I think the average, you know… it averages out more on the Advanced side most people end up chosing the upgrade. Okay, great. I think people who see the full value and really see Shift as something that they end up relying on in their day to day end up, upgrading to advance, so it’s really more leaning to the $100 a year price point. But yeah, we’re… I guess we’re 18 months in and, you know, it’s nice to see that we can get people in the door and people can use Shift for free and get utility out of it, but then choose if it’s something they want to upgrade on.

Paul: Great. So sounds like there’s a clear kind of roadmap and probably pushing up in terms of organisational size. Is there anything you can tell us about? In terms of future developments? I understand if you can’t, anything around the corner?

Nadia: Yeah, I think somewhere where we see opportunity, potentially down the road is mobile, we’ve really focused in on the desktop as being the pain point. You know, there’s a lot of options for Mobile Email management, and it tends to be less of a pain point. But there’s definitely a huge opportunity for Shift to be, you know… just cover cover all devices, basically, right now, we’ve really honing in on desktop as the issue.

Paul: So, is that through customer feedback?

Nadia: Um, yeah, I think so. And just in terms of… we do run mobile ads, and we know that there, you know, most of our customers are on their phones all day too, so it wouldn’t hurt, I don’t think to have that. But otherwise, I think immediately, apps are a big focus. So making sure that we’re offering everything that our customers actually rely on every day because that tends to be a decision making point, it’s a make or break thing, we need to offer a huge selection.

Paul: So one of the things that… just hearing your story that I’m interested in is, you know, the shift that you’ve made, on a more personal note, from agency to, SaaS company, and you’ve gone from being a marketer on the front line. To now, you probably wear many hats, but you’re more of a general manager in that kind of shift role. So more overseeing the aspect of marketing, in that kind of personal development, from from agency side to SaaS, to now, management, if I can call you that. What have you found that has been the big challenges for you, as you’ve gone long.

Nadia: You know, I guess even to go back further, when I started at Redbrick, Marketing was almost off the side of my desk, and I was doing a lot of sales. And, really focused in on revenue growth through our publishers, and then our advertising base. So I think getting really… you know, I’ve had a good split through my career of marketing and sales, partnerships, and really just start up, where I think everyone wears a lot of hats and everyone’s pretty close to the bottom line. So I think that that’s been a cool experience for me, and something that’s kind of made that transition a little bit more organic, where, you know, I look around now, and we do look like more of a, you know, corporate type company, but I think we operate more like a startup. And Shift definitely within the Redbrick umbrella is really a startup within. So I actually manage, I have my head in our Facebook campaigns every day, my head in our Google stuff every day working with our designers to build up the creative. And then you know, and then more the management side, we have a growing team. And, then, even writing content and stuff. It’s something we have a team behind but we’re… I definitely have my finger on the pulse still on all that so.

Paul: Great, Nadia, thank you very much for taking the time to talk to me today. I really appreciate it. I wish you good luck with Shift, thank you.

Paul: I hope you enjoyed my conversation with Nadia. For more info on Shift, please visit tryshift.com. For more info about this show. And to get our links to iTunes, Google Play SoundCloud, Stitcher and YouTube, check out www.remixcave.com. And if you have any SaaS marketing insights that you’d like to share on the show, please get in touch. Until next time.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The post Ep. 20: Launching Shift with Nadia Tatlow of Redbrick appeared first on 47 Insights.

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http://www.remixcave.com/blog/launching-shift-nadia-tatlow-redbrick/feed/ 0 Nadia Tatlow, General Manger of Shift app at Redbrick, outlines how she went about launching the product on Product Hunt and driving traffic through Google and Facebook. Nadia Tatlow, General Manger of Shift app at Redbrick, outlines how she went about launching the product on Product Hunt and driving traffic through Google and Facebook. 47 Insights yes 19:43
Ep. 19: Growing The Checkfront Marketing Team with Angela Heald http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-19-growing-checkfront-marketing-team-angela-heald/ http://www.remixcave.com/blog/ep-19-growing-checkfront-marketing-team-angela-heald/#respond Mon, 05 Nov 2018 13:00:15 +0000 http://www.remixcave.com/?p=958 Angela Heald joined SaaS booking software company Checkfront three years ago with a mandate to build a marketing department. How did she go about building her team, and what did she learn in the process?

The post Ep. 19: Growing The Checkfront Marketing Team with Angela Heald appeared first on 47 Insights.

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SaaS Marketing Insights Episode 19: Angela Heald, Checkfront

Angela Heald joined SaaS booking software company Checkfront three years ago with a mandate to build a marketing department. How did she go about building her team, and what did she learn in the process?

Editor: breandanmcghee@gmail.com


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Episode 19 Transcript

Paul: Hello and welcome to SaaS Marketing Insights, the show where we ask SaaS founders, CEOs, marketers and investors about the lessons they’ve learned in their quest to grow their companies. My name is Paul Stephenson, and I’m founder and CEO of SaaS marketing agency 47insights. On today’s show, I have an interview with Angela Heald, marketing manager at Checkfront. Hope you enjoy it.

So I’m here with Angela Heald, who’s the marketing manager at Checkfront. And this follows on from our conversation had with Jason Morehouse, CEO.

Angela: How’d he do?

Paul:? How did he do? I think he did really well, it was really… really interesting from my perspective, learning how, you know, the business got started from scratch, bootstrap from nothing. And you know, the bit that we want to talk about today is, those guys got it so far. But then they had to hand it over to the professionals… the marketing professionals, which is you and your team. And I guess the interesting thing is, how you took it from where it was at that stage, and grew a marketing department. So just to sort of back up. How did you get started started in marketing?

Angela: Yeah, so I was actually studying international business at university. And the courses that I loved the most were the marketing courses.

Paul: Very sensible.

Angela: Yes. However, my university staggered when they offered those courses. So to switch to marketing, I would have put myself back a year. And so I just set the goal to get my first job in marketing.

Paul: Cool. And so what was your first job in marketing?

Angela: So it was agency style SEO.

Paul: Right. That’s very dear to my heart. And how long were you in that role?

Angela: So I was exclusively doing that for maybe about seven months. And then I started to train people on it, I moved into PPC and slowly made my way across all the other online marketing channels.

Paul: Wow, so you had quite a broad base, before you came to Checkfront and guess at that stage… you didn’t know anything about bookings or tourist industry or whatever, those were all just like, B2B or different industries.

Angela: Yeah, so the agency that I got most of my experience in was also B2B. However, it wasn’t SaaS. So that was a whole new world. What really endeared me to Checkfront is the space we work in, travel and tourism. And there’s nothing I’m more passionate about so…

Paul: Becasue you get to go to nice places.

Angela: Totally. Nothing more fun.

Paul: So how long ago was it before you made that? Did you go straight from agency to Checkfront? Or was there anything in between?

Angela: Um, well, I had moved into… at the same agency I had moved into their marketing department actually founded their marketing apartment.

Paul: Oh, right, so you’re an old hand at this.

Angela: Yes. Yeah, I was one of the founding members of that. And that was a bit of a different beast, because it became marketing for the company, as opposed to for the company’s clients.

Paul: Yeah. And then you made the transition to Checkfront? So how long ago was that?

Angela: Just about two and a half years ago?

Paul: Oh, wow, but it feels like forever?

Angela: Well… sometimes feels like forever, sometimes feels like five days.

Paul: So what was the state… if I can put that the right way, of marketing in Checkfront, because the impression I got from Jason is that a lot of the initiatives, this sort of made things up a bit as they went along, it was very quick and dirty. And there must have been a bit more semblance of order to actually warrent employing you or to have, you know, the faith that you could… you could make a difference. So, you know, when you came in? What was this situation?

Angela: Yeah, so there was not a tonne of structure, I think the person that had previously done most of the marketing was also working heavily in product, she’s now our Director of Product, she moved full time into product. And that was when they knew they needed to hire somebody full time to look at the marketing. When I came in, they had a really come off a good run of years, leveraging free channels, kind of just taking leads where they get them. And yeah, and, you know, that obviously, changes very quickly. I think they knew that they needed to invest more in the marketing.

Paul: So when you joined, and the other person moved across product, you had a marketing department of one, you?

Angela: That’s right. Just me.

Paul: So that must have been quite daunting to come into a business that you hadn’t been involved with before, and then take on this role. So you know, you’re a marketer with some experience at that point. But here you are in an industry that you don’t know anything about. It’s a cool business. You like the look of it, you like the people, but then you’ve got to start understanding what SaaS marketing is all about.

Angela: Exactly. Yeah. I mean, it was incredibly exciting. And I had a really good base in all of the online marketing channels specifically. So I came in pretty confident. It was just a matter of, I guess, understanding what they had done up to the point where I entered what had worked really well. Thinking about what I wanted to do moving forward, how I was going to make my mark in this company. And and yeah, and going from there, I was… I was totally excited, I probably should have been a little more nervous then I was.

Paul: So how long did it take, before you realise that you really needed to hire to help you.

Angela: I mean, I could have hired the second I started. I don’t think that, you know, I needed to get really overwhelmed to figure that out. There was a lot that we needed to do, a lot we wanted to do. And I very quickly